Browse Our Community Businesses


Medical Care and Facilities
                       
Four Bands Community Fund
   Businesses and Services Listing

Presentation College-Lakota Campus

Cheyenne River Chamber of Commerce

Native Discovery With Cheyenne Reservation only

Tribal Ventures

Horizons-TREE





Business Name:



1st Financial Bank

PO Box 98 / 101 E. Main St. 
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: 9 am - 3 pm, Mon., Tues., Wed., and Fri; 9 am - 5:30 pm, Thurs.
Phone: 605-365-5191
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A Touch of Therapy

Contact: Margaret O’Leary
Hours: By appointment only
Phone: 605-964-8480 or 605-222-1167 (cell)
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: message
Services: lymph drainage
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Aberle & Aberle Attorneys

Contact: Steve Aberle
PO Box 236
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon.- Fri.
Phone: 605-865-3528
Business Type:  Attorney, legal services
Services: General Legal Services
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Aberle Construction, Inc.

Contact: Pat Aberle
PO Box 521
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 7am - 5:30 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-200-0666
Business Type: Construction
Services: Concrete, Sand and Gravel
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ABJ Feeds

Contact: AJ Starr
Box 516
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 7 am - 7 pm, Mon. - Sat.
Phone: (605) 739-5771 or (605) 515-0106
Business Type: agricultural, feed supplement
Services: Sweet Pro- horse and cattle feed
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Air Kraft Spraying

Contact: Jake Kraft
PO Box 71
Timberlake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: vary, call for information
Phone: (605) 865-3500
Business Type: agricultural, weed control
Services: aerial crop spraying
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All That Glitters, etc. 

Contact: Jamie Farlee, Owner
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: (605) 964-2790 or 605-200-0053 (cell)
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: fashion accessories, jewlery
Services: Offers home shows featuring handbags, jewelry and accessories. Call to set up an appointment.
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Anderson Construction

Contact: Valle Ra Anderson
PO Box 335
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-7645 or 605-964-6717
Services: dirt construction such as building site foundations, dams, etc.
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Annie’s Catering

Contact: Ann Walker
HCR 30 -Box 10
Mobridge, SD 57601
Hours: weekends and summer, call for information
Phone: 605-733-2491
Business Type: Catering
Services: catering meals, conventions, parties, etc.
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Apple Tee Cottage

Contact: Nyla Opp
811 E. St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57626
Hours: 8 am - 4 pm, Mon. - Sat.
Phone: (605) 865-3621
Business Type: gifts and handcrafted items
Services: handcrafted gift items, decorations, baby gifts, coffee shop and serves lunches
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Ash Creek Taxidermy

HCR 73 Box 9
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-365-5458
Services: Taxidermy services
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B&K Storage

HC 73 Box 9
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-365-5458
Services: storage buildings
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Bad Warrior Management Services

Contact: Dugan Bad Warrior
Box 1546
Eagle Butte, SD
Hours: 8am - 5pm Mon-Fri
Phone: 605-200-1795
Business Type: Construction
Services: Contruction Management / Consulting
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Biegler Equipment/NAPA

Contact: Bart Biegler
1010 N. Main St.
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 7 am - 6 pm Mon. - Fri; 7 am - 4 pm Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3505 or 605-865-3507
Business Type: automotive repair and parts
Services: parts, truck and car tire repair and sales, field work
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Bogue & Bogue Law Office

Contact: Cheryl bogue
Box 400
Dupree, SD
Hours:  8am - 5pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5171
Business Type: Attorney
Services: legal advice; travel, criminal, IRS, estate planning
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Bollinger Trucking

Contact: Tim Bollinger
HCR 64 Box 176
Timber Lake, SD
Hours: anytime, call to make arrangements
Phone: 605-865-3586 Shop: 605-845-6038
Business Type: Trucking
Services: hauling cattle, grain, hay, rock and corn
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Bones From the Prairie

Contact: Mary Lu Griffith
Box 75
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5227
Business Type:  Art, custom made jewelry
Services: custom made jewelry and woodworking
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Bonnie’s Quilting Boutique

Contact: Bonnie LeBeau
PO Box 1602 / 300 East Frontier St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Vary
Phone: 605-964-7642
Business Type: Quilting
Services: Custom machine-stitch quilting
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Buffalo Run Tipi Village

Contact: Les Ducheneaux
Hours: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Phone: 605-733-2547
Fax: 605-733-2585
Website:  http://buffaloruntipivillage.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Lodging, Camping, Tourism (summer time only)
Services: weddings, reunions, retreats, funerals, ceremonies, powwows, meetings, conferences, Governmental organizations, non-profit entities, private businesses and affiliated groups will all be welcome. Reasonable rates and an unmatched experience await those who choose to stay with us.
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Bunkhouse Inn

Contact: Margaret Lindskov
608 Main St. 
Isabel, South Dakota 57633
Hours: Open year round, call for reservations
Phone: 466-2666/ 466-2112/ 466-2354
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: accommodations
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Busted Wire Fencing

Contact: Jackie Elder
HCR 64 Box 182
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Hours: Seasonal, call for information
Phone: (605) 865-3524
Fax: (605) 865-3524
Services: Custom fencing
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C Hawk Enterprise

Contact: Curtis Chasing Hawk
920 Jefferson NE
Eagle Butte, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-2207 or 605-200-9035 (cell)
Business Type: House re-modeling
Services: Home maintanence, repair, and remodeling
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Central Dakota Feed & Seed

Contact: Jake Kraft
PO Box 71
Timberlake, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm Mon - Fri
Phone: (605) 865-3611
Business Type: Elevator
Services: Livestock Feed
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Charlies Garden Sculptures

Contact: Charlie Frost
PO Box 398
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Evening 5 pm - 8 pm
Phone: 605-964-4585 or 200-0767 (cell)
Business Type: Yard and Garden
Services: Bird Houses, Planter, Benches
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Cherry Creek Tire Company

Contact: Nathan Mosher
PO Box 156
Cherry Creek, South Dakota 57622
Hours: 9 am- 5:30 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 10 am - 3 pm, Sat.; closed Sun
Phone: 605-538-4482
Fax: 605-538-4313
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: tire service including new and used tires, tire mounting and balancing, minor mechanic service
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Cheyenne River Archaeological Services

Contact: Ray Pysarsky
PO Box 295
Timber Lake, South Dakota
Hours: Open
Phone: (605) 865-3357
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Consultation
Services: Archaeological consultation, compliance & Review Surveys
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Cheyenne River Elderly Nutrrition Center

Contact: Iyonne Garreau
101 Lincoln E.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon.- Fri.
Phone: 605-965-8056
Fax: 605-964-8057
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: lunch service for lderly tribal members and handicapped persons
Services: serves reduced-priced lunches to elderly tribal members and handicapped persons. Cost $.75 for elderly (65 and up) and their spouce. $3.00 for youth. Delivery abailable to some outlying communities. Pick-up service available for handicap persons.
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Cheyenne River Gas Company

Contact: Allen Ducheneaux
PO Box 810 / 311 S. Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-3307
Fax: 605-964-1080
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: retail propane supplier
Services: Sells and delivers propane, serves locals and tourists, fills residential propane tanks, will refill 20 lb or larger clylinders, sells smaller cylinders
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Cheyenne River Motel

Contact: LuAnne Bruguier, Manager
PO Box 180 / S. Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Front desk is always open, business office open 8 am- 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 964-8888
Fax: (605) 964-8880
Business Type: accommodations, motel
Services: motel with mail delivery to room, fac service, and a conference room, complimentary coffee and continental breakfast
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Cheyenne River Ranch

Contact: Jerry Farlee
PO Box 850
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: (605) 964-2333 or (605) 365-6599
Website:  www.cheyenneriveroutfitters.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: accommodations, tipi stays, hunting
Services: buffalo tours, horseback riding, canoeing, buffal hunts, wildlife viewing
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Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Ventures

Contact: Eileen Briggs, Executive Director
PO Box 1683
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 605-964-2016
Fax: 605-964-2017
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: non-profit, community resource
Services: provides financial and technical assistance to residents of the Cheyenne River Reservatin for the purpose of poverty reduction
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Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Fitness Center

Contact: Dustin Gunville
Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota
Hours: 6 am - 6;30 pm, Mon. - Fri. (Summer hours)
Phone: 605-964-6190
Fax: 605-964-4190
Business Type: tribally-operated non-profit fitness center
Services: free weights, cardio machines, and stretch machines
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Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Game, Fish & Parks Department

Contact: Narcisse D. Rousseau, Director or Denelle High Elk
PO Box 590 / Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 605-964-7812
Fax: 605-964-7811
Website:  www.crstgfp.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Tribal Game, Fish and Parks and Tourism Office
Services: Manages all of teh wildlife, fisheries, and recreational resources on all trust lands within the boundaries of the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation
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Cheynne River Ranch

Contact: Jerry Farlee
PO Box 850
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 605-964-2333 or 605-365-6599
Website:  www.cheyenneriveroutfitters.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Accommodations, tipi ways, hunting
Services: buffalo tours, horseback riding, canoeing, buffalo hunts, wildlife viewing
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City of Dupree

Contact: Robyn Dupree
PO Box 276
Dupree, SD 57623
Phone: 605-365-5181
Fax: 605-365-5181
Website:  www.dupreesd.com
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City of Eagle Butte

Contact: Sheila Ganje
PO Box 150 209 Main St. 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Phone: 605-964-8783
Fax: 605-694-8785
Website:  www.eaglebuttesd.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
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City of Isabel

Contact: Rita Frank
PO Box 268 / 108 E. Kansas St. 
Isabel, SD 57633
Phone: 605-466-2177
Fax: 605-466-2177
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
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City of Timber Lake

Contact: Grady Kraft
PO Box 431 / 700 Main St. 
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Phone: 605-865-3790
Fax: 605-865-3168
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
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Cody Eaton Trucking

Contact: Cody Eaton
PO Box 5
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-365-5347
Services: hot mix hauling, cattle, gravel.
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Collins One Stop

Contact: Terry and Janet Collins
PO Box 1244 / Towerhill Rd.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Sat.; closed on Sun.
Phone: 605-964-6134 or 605-200-0365
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: mechanic service, towing and welding
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Country Market

Contact: John Linderman
412 9th
Timber Lake, SD
Hours: 7am- 6pm Mon-Sat
Phone: 605-865-3606
Business Type: Grocery store
Services: Groceries, Cards, Balloons
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CRST Telephone Authority

Contact: JD Williams, General Manager
PO Box 810
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 605-964-2600
Fax: 605-964-1000
Website:  www.crstta.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: telephone, internet, television, gas sales and service of individuals living on the Cheyenne River Reservation
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D & D Bait and Tackle Shop ( D & D Plumbing & Heating, Inc.)

Contact: Gerald Davidson
PO Box 1398 / 216 Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-7000
Business Type: plumbing and heating installation and repair
Services: residential and commercial pumbing and heating installation and repair
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D & D Plumbig & Heating, Inc.

Contact: Gerald Davidson
PO Box 1398 / 216 Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-7000
Business Type: plumbing and heating installation and repair
Services: residential and commercial plumbing and heating installation and repair
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D & K Ag Service

Contact: Donald and Kimberly McDaniel
1 Aireport Road
Lantry, South Dakota 57636
Phone: (605) 964-6624 or cell (605) 365-7315
Business Type: Ag Commercial Spraying
Services: chemical crop protection
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D & R Propane

Contact: Dave or Richard Neigel
PO Box 581 / W. Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-4508
Fax: 605-964-4508
Business Type: propane and propane accessories dealer
Services: sells and delivers propane, fills cylinders, sells propane appliances and hook-up equipment, leases tanks, services RVs and homes
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Dakota Club Library

Contact: Karen Garber
219 South Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota
Hours: 11 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-7662
Fax: 605-964-7662
Business Type: nonprofit education resource center
Services: book check out, video viewing, internet access, newspaper and magazine reading
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Dakota Plains Legal Services

Contact: Sara Ward or Pat Donovan
PO Box 500
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 8:30 am - 5 pm, Mon.- Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-2175
Business Type: Attorney
Services: Legal Services
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Dakota Round-up Restaurant and Lounge

Contact: Chuck or Ranae Hack
901 Main St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 6 am - 9 pm, Mon. - Thur., 6 am - 10 pm, Fri. - Sat.
Phone: (605) 865-3351
Business Type: Dining, restaurant and lounge
Services: catering, retaurant, lounge
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Dakota Silk Screen, Embroidery & Awards

Contact: Ann Crance
PO Box 331
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57626
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon-Fri; 10-3, Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3266
Business Type: Apparel, Embroidery, Awards
Services: clothing, embroidery, silk screen, trophies and plaques
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Day Care

Contact: Darla Shupick
PO Box 1745 / Hwy 212 and Willow St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 7:30 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 964-6252
Services: learning center for ages 3-5, pre-kindergarden skills
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Delia Hale Star Quilts

Contact: Delia Hale gray house W.of Cherry Creek post offic
PO Box 233
Cherry Creek, SD 57622
Hours: Please call to order.
Phone: 605-538-4357
Business Type: custom made quilts
Services: custom made quilts by order only (no pre-made quilts available)
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Denton Construction

Contact: Galen Denton
PO Box 315, 
Dupree SD
Hours: 8 am -5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5264
Business Type: Type: Construction, building and remodeling
Services: remodels homes, constructs garages, etc.
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Double A Outfitters, LLC

Contact: Lyle Anderson
PO Box 111
White Horse, South Dakota 57661
Hours: vary, call for reservations
Phone: 733-2223
Business Type: accommodations, hunting rand and lodge
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DQ Grill and Chill

Contact: Lonnie Heier
PO Box 510 / Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8:30 am - 10 pm, 7 days a week
Phone: (605) 964-1150
Fax: (605) 964-1151
Business Type: fast food restaurant
Services: breakfast sandwiches, burgers, chicken, fish sandwiches, ice cream products and specialty cakes, can schedule birthday parties
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Drain Busters, Inc.

Contact: Bill Phillips
PO Box 164
Trill City, South Dakota 57657
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-845-7626
Business Type: heating and cooling
Services: heating, cooling, commercial refrigeration
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Dupree Oil Company

Contact: Dave Thomas and Pam Henderson
HC 83 Box 100
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 7 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 7 am - 2 pm, Sat. (times may vary on Sat.
Phone: 605-365-5217 or 605-365-5360
Fax: 605-365-5360
Services: sells bulk petroleum and gravel
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Dupree Senior Citizen Center

Contact: Carmen Russell
PO Box 113
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 10 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5368
Business Type: Senior Citizen Center
Services: Reduced Meal Program
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Eagle Butte Coop

Contact: Kristi Fischer
PO Box 370 / Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 6 am - 9 pm, Mon. -  Sat.; 7 am - 5 pm, Sun. 
Phone: 605-964-2226
Fax: 605-964-2220
Website:  eaglebuttecoop.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: conveniece store, auto shop and feed/fertilizer
Services: service station (gas), conveniece store (chips, snacks, newspapers, fast food etc) and auto shop, repairs, tires, elevator with feed for sale, seed and chemical fertilizer Delivery service available for gas, feed, and seed.
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Eagle Butte Lodge

Contact: Aldina Moran
PO B 764
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605)964-3677
Business Type: boarding house
Services: provides rooms
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Eagle Butte NAPA

Contact: Curt Neumiller
PO Box 544 /  Hwy 212 & Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - noon, Sat.
Phone: 605-964-4686
Fax: 605-964-4687
Services: provided, auto parts store
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Eagle Butte Package Liquor

Contact: Buddy Colombe II
Homestead Ave. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 11 am - 11 pm, Mon. - Thurs.; 11 am - midnight, Fri. and Sat.; closed Sun.
Phone: 605-964-3647
Business Type: off-sale liquor store
Services: alcoholic beverages, cigarettes, and snacks
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Eagle Butte Plumbing & Heating

Contact: Carrie Becker
PO Box 653 / 336 Maple St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-3162
Fax: 605-964-3162
Business Type: plumbing, heating, and air conditioning repair and backhoe trenching
Services: plumbing, heating, and air conditioning repair, parts, sewer camera and backhoe trenching service
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Eagle Butte Saddle Shop

Contact: John Bachman
PO Box 746 / 111 S. Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-8138
Business Type: boot and saddle repair
Services: western tack repair, saddle repair, and horse riding gear and goods
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EAGLE BUTTE, Eagle Stop/Taco John’s

Contact: Elaine Neigel
Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: Eagle Stop, open 24 hours a day; Taco John’s, 10 am - 10 pm
Phone: 605-964-8146
Fax: 605-964-8146
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: convenience store/gas and mexican fast food
Services: Eagle Stop, gas, food, snacks, ice, coffee, soda drinks, phone cards, newspapers and magazines Taco John’s, mexican fast food, beverages
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Eagle Storage

Contact: Jeremy Schad
PO Box 75 / Hwy 212
Lantry, SD 57636
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-365-7228
Website:  www.eaglestorage.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: storage buildings
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Eva’s Hair & Nails

Contact: Eva Gilbert
PO Box 1499 / Spiel Ct. #16
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m , Mon. Fri, call for appointments after 5:00, walkins welcome during regular business hours
Phone: 605-964-6241
Business Type: Hair Care
Services: women’s and men’s haircuts, colors, highlights, perms, nails, eyebrow waxing, facials, makeup, make-overs, can order specialty products
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Family Health Center

Contact: General Staff
315 S. Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri., by appointment only. No emergency or surgery care. 
Phone: 605-964-8000
Fax: 605-964-1118
Business Type: primary health care facility
Services: acute and chronic care, lab work, physicals, drug tests
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Farm Service Agency

Contact: TBD
PO Box 95
Dupree, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 4:30 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 365-5179
Business Type: Government
Services: Assist with Farm Loans, Government Agriculture Programs
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Farmers Union Oil/Cenex

Contact: Curt Nehlich
Main St. 
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 6:30 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 6:30 - 5 pm, Sat.; closed Sundays
Phone: 605-365-5212
Fax: 605-365-5117
Services: hardware store and auto repair and service
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Farmers Union Oil/Cenex

Contact: Curt Nehlich
Hwy 212
Durpee
Hours: 7 days a week, 6 am - 9 pm
Phone: 605-365-5212
Fax: 605-364-5117
Services: convenience and fuel Main St.,Dupree Hours:6:30 am - 6 pm, Mon.-Fri.; 6:30 am - 5 pm, Sat.; closed Sundays Services:hardware store and auto repair and service Hwy 212, Faith Hours:7 days a week, 7 am - 9 pm Services:convenience and fuel, 24 our fueling with credit card
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Farmers Union Oil/Cenex

Contact: Curt Nehlich
Three locations: Hwy 212, 
Dupree, South Dakota
Hours: 7 days a week, 6 am - 9 pm
Phone: 605-365-5212
Fax: 605-365-5117
Services: convenience and fuel
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Farmers Union Oil/Cenex

Contact: Curt Nehlich
Hwy 212
Faith (Convenience, gas)
Hours: 7 days a week, 7 am - 9 pm
Services: convenience and fuel, 24 hours fueling with credit card
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Frank Ganje True Value

Contact: Rob Ganje Sr. or Rob Ganje Jr.
PO Box 250 / 201 S. Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Sat.; 9 am - 6 pm, Sun.
Phone: (605) 964-2200
Fax: (605) 964-2200
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Hardware Store
Services: automotive, small and large appliances, electronics, lawn and garden, toys, housewares, plumbing, paint and paint supplies
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Ganje Feeds

Contact: Alan Ganje
p.o. Box 283
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 7 am to 6pm Mon. to Sat.
Phone: 605-964-7017
Business Type: Agricultural, vet supplies, feed and seed
Services: feed, vet supplies, twine, pet food, seed
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Gary’s Drywall and Texture Painting

Contact: Gary Frederick
PO Box 845
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 733-2515
Fax: 733-2515
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: General carpentry
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General Trading Company (GTC)

Contact: Marilyn Balderas
PO Box 723 N. Hwy, 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - 12 pm, Sat.
Phone: 605-964-2168
Business Type: Automotive parts
Services: Automotive Parts
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Gry’s Drywall & Texture painting

Contact: Gary Fredrick
PO Box 845
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 733-2515
Fax: 733-2515
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GTC Auto Parts, Inc.

Contact: Curt Neumiler
PO Box 728
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - noon, Sat.
Phone: 605-964-2168
Business Type: car parts
Services: auto parts, specialty tools, special orders
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H&R Block

Contact: Missy Wientjes
201 Main St. 
Mobridge, SD 57601
Hours: Thurs. 11 am - 5 pm
Phone: 605-845-3970
Business Type: Tax Preparation
Services: Tax Preparation
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Harding Motel

Contact: John Kessler
PO Box 1578 / N. Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Open year round, call for reservations
Phone: (605) 964-2448
Fax: (605) 964-2449
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: accommodations, motel
Services: HBO and cable television, Coke machine, complimentary coffee and cappuccino
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Healing Hands

Contact: Sandy Frazier
911 Jefferson
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: call for appointment
Phone: 605-200-0394
Fax: 
Business Type: alternative health practices
Services: energy work, reaki, quanum touch
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Herman’s Service

Contact: Bob Herman
PO Box 310
Timber Lake, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri.;8 am - 5 pm, Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3583
Business Type: gas station, petroleum and repairs
Services: Full Service Gas & Repair Station
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Hi Kaga Denture Service

Contact: Mike Raymore
PO box 195
Ridgeview, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 733-2566 or 964-2010 for Vision Care Associates
Fax: 605-964-1118
Services: IHS Dental Clinic, produces dentures, vision care, general eye care, eyewear, contact lenses, medical treatment of eyes, eyewear repair, and adjustments
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Hot Spot Drive In

Contact: Shelly Brehmer
Main St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: Seasonal, 10 am - 10 pm, May 1 - Oct. - 1
Phone: (605) 365-5799
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: fast-food restaurant featuring hamburgers, chicken, french fries, ice cream, malts
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House Painting and Design / H Bar 2 Silver Engraving

Contact: Una Howe
PO Box 156
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57626
Phone: 605-365-5437
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: house hold painting and silver engraving
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Howe Painting & Design / H Bar 2 Silver Engraving

Contact: Una Howe
PO Box 156
Dupree, SD 57623
Phone: 605-365-5437
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: household painting and silver engraving
Services: interior/exterior custom painting and silver engraving
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HVJ Lakota Cultural Center

Contact: Trini Bird Necklace, Director
PO Box 590 / US Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8:00am - 12:00pm & 1:00pm - 5:00pm Mon - Fri
Phone: 605-964-2542
Fax: 605-964-1222
Business Type: Gift Shop; beadwork, wood carvings, leather work, arts & crafts supplies, sweet grass, sage, red willow tobacco, star quilts, Lakota Dictionaries, Pendleton blankets, baby star quilts, Pow-wow CD’s, Documentary DVD’s, elk antler jewelry, and color prints.
Services: Open for building rental, for Meetings, Workshops, Cultural activities, Flea Markets, Birthdays, Memorials, and Naming Ceremonies etc.. Tent rental, (seasonal) 40x40 or 40x60 call to reserve in advance.  *Unique Gift Shop with authentic Lakota arts & crafts * Hall of Murals featuring painting by local artists * Home of many cultural events such as art shows and Pow-wows * A great place to meet people of the Cheyenne River Lakota Naiton
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Welcome To The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Web Site

TECA (JTAC) Ordinance 74

Watch The Live Video Stream

 

     
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© Copyright 2008, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, all rights reserved.
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Native American Tribe.

Salazar Per Capita Distribution

Salazar Per Capita Press Release 4/30/2013

CRST Per Cap Form 5 - Instructions

CRST_Per_Cap_Form_1_-_Distribution Request Form

CRST_Per_Cap_Form_2_-_Joint Stipulation of Both Parents

CRST_Per_Cap_Form_3_-_Affidavit of Sole Parent

 

 

Salazar Press Release

Salazar Press Release 5/3/2013


Salazar Press Release

Per Capita Form 1

Per Capita Form 1

Per Capita Form 5

Per Capita Form 5

Per Capita Form 2

Per Capita Form 2

Per Capita Form 3

Per Capita Form 3


If you have any questions regarding the Salazar Per Capita you may send an e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call (605) 964-8388

CRST MIS Department

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
MIS Director
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
605-964-8253
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Help Desk

WORK ORDERS


Please fill out a MIS Work Order, and email it to Nick Woods, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Access your e-mail at https://mail.cheyenneriversiouxtribe-nsn.gov/owa
Note: Once you link to the government email you will be required to provide your username and password to gain access.

FYI

Live streaming of Tribal Council is now available on website. Video on demand allows you to view the days you missed. 

“Kola/Maske” Friend!

Wakpa Waste Oyanke wouspe omnaya tawogmuke
    el tanyan yahi, ye/yelo.

          Wakpa Waste Oyanke ki makoce wiyute kokta
            yamni wan el wicoti ki he Wakpa yamni ogna
              iyaye ca hena wakpala caje wicakupi ki lena
                e: Mni Sose (Missouri River - muddy water),
                  Wakpa Waste (Cheyenne River - good river),
                    na ahake ki he Hinhan Wakpa
                    (Moreau River - Owl Creek). Wakpa Waste
                    Oyanke ki lehanl makoce wan el wicoti
                      ki he wasicuya South Dakota (Kola Itogaka
                      takiya) eya pi ca Wakpa Waste Oyanke ki
                      cokan wicoti pi lehanl, Mni Sose etan
                      Wiohpiyatakiya.
                      Wakpa Waste Oyanke ki hel tiospaye topa
                    oyanke kaga pi na hena lel epi:
                  Mnikoju, Owohe Nupa, Itazipa Cola na Siha Sapa.

JTAC Ordinance

Please click a link below to view the pdf

Memorandum / Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – General
Chapter 2 – Economic Development Fund
Chapter 3 – Infrastructure Development Fund
Chapter 4 – Education, Health, Recreation, and Social Welfare Fund

Employment

Job Advertisement

Job Advertisement


Tribal Application(Please fill out & print)
Please be advised that we require the original signature on the application.
Head Start Job Application

 

Tribal Council Committee Meetings Calendar

August Calendar

Apology Accepted

For Immediate Release October 29, 2010

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH


Apology Accepted?
By Roseanna Renaud

Concealed inside the 2010 defense appropriations bill amid the billions earmarked for military spending was a long-awaited formal apology from the United States to Tribal governments and Native people nationwide.  You had to hunt for it, but there it was on page 109 of the 161 page bill.  While the statement does not resolve many challenges still facing Indian Country, the words within Section 8113(a) were a long time coming.  Senators Sam Brownback (R., Kan.) and Byron Dorgan (D., N.D.) crossed party lines and several years to lead the campaign for the Native American Apology Resolution, which had been introduced in previous Congresses without success.  President Barack Obama signed the first public admission of remorse to Native Americans into law on Monday, December 21.  “The resolution seeks reconciliation and offers an official apology to Native peoples for the poor choices the federal government made in the past,” said Brownback. “I firmly believe that in order to move forward and have a true reconciliation, the federal government needs to formally apologize.” Brownback continued, “While we cannot erase the past, it is time for us to heal past wounds. We should acknowledge previous failures, express sincere regrets, and work toward establishing a brighter future for all Americans.” Senator Brownback’s April 30, 2009 joint resolution contains additional historical details on the “long history of official depredations and ill-conceived policies by the Federal Government regarding Indian tribes”.  The official apology is printed here in its entirety.  At the end of the statement is a clause regarding non-support of any lawsuit claims against the government.  Also included in the bill are other items of interest to Indian Country, such as contracts with Tribal Governments and the Operation Walking Shield Program, which provides Air Force housing units to tribes.
The official statement praises state governments that have brought about reconciliation with the tribal administrations inside state borders.  Twenty years ago, then South Dakota Governor George Mickelson and representatives of the state’s nine tribal governments proclaimed 1990 a Year of Reconciliation and called for the first Native American Day observance, now held annually on Columbus Day.  A Century of Reconciliation was declared in 1991.

Department of Defense Appropriations Act 2010
APOLOGY TO NATIVE PEOPLES OF THE UNITED STATES
SEC. 8113. (a) ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND APOLOGY.—
The United States, acting through Congress—recognizes the special legal and political relationship Indian tribes have with the United States and the solemn covenant with the land we share; commends and honors Native Peoples for the thousands of years that they have stewarded and protected this land; recognizes that there have been years of official depredations, ill-conceived policies, and the breaking of covenants by the Federal Government regarding Indian tribes; apologizes on behalf of the people of the United States to all Native Peoples for the many instances of violence, maltreatment, and neglect inflicted on Native Peoples by citizens of the United States; expresses its regret for the ramifications of former wrongs and its commitment to build on the positive relationships of the past and present to move toward a brighter future where all the people of this land live reconciled as brothers and sisters, and harmoniously steward and protect this land together; urges the President to acknowledge the wrongs of the United States against Indian tribes in the history of the United States in order to bring healing to this land; and commends the State governments that have begun reconciliation efforts with recognized Indian tribes located in their boundaries and encourages all State governments similarly to work toward reconciling relationships with Indian tribes within their boundaries.

DISCLAIMER.—Nothing in this section—authorizes or supports any claim against the United States; or serves as a settlement of any claim against the United States.

Grand Opening of the Second Tribal Field Office on the Reservation

GRAND OPENING OF SECOND 477 PROGAM FIELD OFFICE

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

7/31/06 D. Alice LaClaire (605)964-8308

Harold C. Frazier, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce the Grand Opening of the second Tribal field office on the reservation.

The doors open to continue the progress of decentralizing Tribal government services for the Cheyenne River Sioux Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Decentralizing has been a priority for Chairman Frazier in response to fulfilling the mandates of the people’s platform. Chairman Harold C. Frazier and Mike Rousseau, District 6 Tribal Council Representative were present for the grand opening of the new field office for the LaPlante community on Tuesday, July 25, 2006.

The passage of Public Law 102-477 by the US Congress made it possible for the CRST to design a more efficient, comprehensive Program, known as the 477 Plan. P.L. 102-477 allows Tribes to consolidate programs that are currently funded into a single coordinated and comprehensive program. For over 25 years the Tribe has managed an employment training program funded through a grant from the Department of Labor, but this program has grown stagnant due to decreasing funding levels and increased numbers of eligible participants.

After many working sessions, the “477 Plan” as it has been called, emerged as a re-designed tribal employment and training program entitled the new Oyate Connections Program. Oyate Connections will be provide the following services at the LaPlante field office – work experience, on-the-job training, youth employment and support services to improve and strengthen the economic and social development within the communities.

This effort is part of the Tribe’s overall poverty reduction work and an investment in workforce development reservation-wide. The field offices will bring tribal services to the communities and reduce the number of miles people have to travel to seek tribal services in Eagle Butte. It will also serve as work sites for TANF and TWEP participants.

The new office in LaPlante is ready for business and welcomes all community members from LaPlante and surrounding communities to utilize their office to conduct their business with the tribe. “We have two more field offices that will be opening its doors in the communities of Cherry Creek and White Horse in the very near future. The staff of Oyate Connections Program are working hard in making the field offices a reality for the communities,” said Chairman Harold C. Frazier.

Barry Mann, Acting Director for the Oyate Connections Program introduced Jean Roberts, Field Supervisor for the LaPlante field office and announced that the office will be in operation Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The phone, fax lines and internet will be installed sometime this week.

Jaci Etzkorn from Cheyenne River Crowned Miss Indian Rodeo

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release November 07, 2005

Jaci Etzkorn from Dupree, South Dakota was crowned Miss Indian Rodeo on October 22, 2005, in San Carlos, Arizona. Jaci ran against two other young Indian Women, all three were tuff competitors. The first day of the judging, October 19th, was the Traditional Indian outfits and presentations. That evening during the reception for the cowboys and cowgirls, the queen contestants had to introduce themselves and explain why they wanted to be Miss Indian Rodeo. The Pageant also had horsemanship competition. Miss Misty Tastsey from Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Browning, Montana received the Horsemanship Award. Jaci Etzkorn, received Miss Congeniality and Miss Marcee George, from White River Arizona was a great competitor.

Jaci Etzkorn comes from a long line of rodeo family. Jaci ranches with her father in the summer time and lives with her mother on her ranch the rest of the year. Jaci is a first year student at Minnesota State University, Moorhead, Minnesota.

Jaci started riding horses at the age of (3) and competing at (5) years old. Her first barrel horse came from her mother and she has been hooked every since. She gives credit to her grandfather Jess Knight, for giving her first horse to break and train. To this day she still uses her horse crawford. Her father is also a great insipration to her. Jaci’s family is very supportive to her in her endeavors. We wish her luck during her reign as Miss Indian Rodeo.

CRST to Receive $1M for Water Intake

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release October 09, 2005

In Jan. 2005, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe sounded the alarm that the Reservation, Ranchers and surrounding towns would be out of water.

Chairman Frazier called the problem a three headed monster: He told the news media; “We have a water system that is breaking down and only has a capacity of 1.2 million gallons a day when it is working. We have a drought which is going to result in the water source soon to be below the level of our intake valve and finally, we have an intake that, having been lowered once already, is now close to be silted in. The silt covering this area is contaminated with arsenic, heavy metals and mercury. 14,000 People are in danger of being out of water!”

A water meeting was held on Mar. 28, 2005 with the purpose of informing the public about the gravity of the situation and to coordinate efforts of all concerned. It is commendable that everyone came together to seek solutions to solve the problem: Indians, Ranchers, Farmers, Mayors, Healthcare providers, Firemen, Teachers, Businessmen and citizens of 4 Counties; Dewey, Ziebach, Meade and Perkins.

This group continued to work on fixing the problem, Meetings were held with Senator Johnson, Senator Thune and Rep. Herseth. The media was kept informed and many meetings occurred with the Corps of Engineers who had the responsibility of providing the Tribe with water. Chairman Frazier and Wayne Ducheneaux, Director of Housing for CRST made trips to Washington DC to educate Members of Congress. Reports, Plans and information was put together and distributed.

Water is not only necessary for life, but also necessary for economic development: the CRST is planning a new hospital, a new Nursing Home, 400 new homes for Members and other projects requiring water.

Due to this concerted effort and the assistance of our Congressional Delegation, the CRST has been informed of a $1 Million dollar federal grant to help fund the emergency water intake project for the Mni Waste’ Water system.

Senator Johnson visited the site of the intake pipe in Sept. and made the following comment; “The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and people across central South Dakota depend on the safe and reliable water service provided by the Mni Waste’ system. However, the current drought situation has the potential to cause a devastating loss of water service to the area. This emergency intake will address the immediate dangers posed by the drought and will provide protection in the long-term against future droughts.”

The $1,000,000 grant money augments the public funds provided for by the Army Corps of Engineers to extend the drinking water intake. The funding comes in the form of a Water and Waste Disposal Grant from the Rural Development Agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Chairman Frazier said he is extremely thankful for all the coordinated effort put forth by everybody. “This is another example of what we can accomplish when we all come together in unity to solve what could have been a disastrous problem. I especially want to thank our Congressional Delegation for listening to us and doing follow up to get the funding for us. The Coup of Engineers deserves appreciation also, now we can get on with development!”

Cheyenne River New Water Intake Ground Breaking Ceremony

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release September 18, 2005

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal officials show their support to the 70 students who are currently attending the fall semester at United Tribes Technical College. Tribal Officials hosted a meeting with the UTTC enrollment and financial aid officers to discuss scholarship and funding opportunties and concerns of the Eagle Butte students. The students were honored by the visit and the officials will take their concerns to the October council session to make nessassary changes to the betterment of the students. Chairman Frazier stated, “We support our students who are attending UTTC, we ask that you stick with it, get good grades and receive your degree so you can come home and help our people.””

General Grisoli of Army Corp of Engineers Meets with Tribal Council and Vice Chairman

General Grisoli of Army Corp of Engineers Meets with Tribal Council and Vice Chairman on Water Needs for Cheyenne River

On April 14, 2005, General Grisoli came to the Cheyenne River reservation for an unprecedented meeting with the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council and the Tribe’s Vice-Chairman, brought on by an impending loss of water by summer time if no solution was put in place before then.

Due to the drought conditions over the past several years, water levels are getting dangerously low, affecting water pressure and quality and drinking water needs of the communities on the reservation.

General Grisoli came to discuss the involvement of the Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE) with the reservation water supply and the water needs of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and its reservation. The area covers 3 counties and supplies water service to Indian and non-indian alike with approximately 14,000 residents.

Vice-Chairman (Raymond) Uses The Knife, Jr. gave a welcoming address to General Grisoli and then opened the floor for the Tribal Council Representatives who asked questions of the General and the ACOE’s committment to the project.

Some of the Council Representatives gave some prepared speeches and others spoke from the heart. Particularly moving was one by District 1 Council Representative Moran and his testimony of the tragedy in his district in February 2004 when 4 small children perished in a house fire in the community of Bear Creek, due to low water pressure. He pointed out to General Grisoli on a map of the reservation, how this community was in the area farthest from the intake pump and the relationship to the low water pressure’s contribution to the inability to extinquish the housefire.

There were also comments from the general public. One that stood out was a young woman, Melanie Lausmann Nowak, from Germany, sitting in the general public, who spoke on the water issue and how in her country it is a fundamental right that all people enjoy water. She stated when a Nation’s leaders see that there is a need for a basic necessity, such as water, then they do all they can to help.

General Grisoli commented on the concerns of the Tribal Council and the public and stated that the Army Corps of Engineers are committed to a temporary solution relative to the looming water crisis.

Ordinarily, when visitors of this stature visit our reservation, they only give a few minutes of their time. However, this was not the case with General Grisoli. It was mentioned several times by Vice-Chairman Uses The Knife of the shortness of time that the General could be here and how he needed to move on to other matters that he was in the area for, but the General stated that this was of more importance hearing the concerns of the Tribal Council and concerned general public and he stayed well beyond the usual curt visits made in the past by other officials.

GPTCA Selects Local Tribal Leaders To Run For National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Office

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release August 22, 2005

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association (GPTCA) held their quarterly meeting in Rapid City, SD on Aug. 15-16, 2005. Under consideration was election of new leadership at upcoming 62 nd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI).

The GPTCA acted to support the candidacy of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier for President of NCAI, Chairman; Sisseton Sioux Tribal Chairman J.C. Crawford for Treasurer of NCAI and Oglala Sioux Tribal President Fire Thunder for Secretary of NCAI.

NCAI was founded in 1944 and is the oldest and largest organization representing and advocating for the rights of American Indians and Alaska Natives. The NCAI Annual Convention will be held in Tulsa, OK on Oct. 30- Nov. 4, 2005. NCAI is anticipating at least 3000 attendees from all the Tribes across the United States. The Theme of this year’s convention is “Celebrating 30 years of Indian Self-Determination.”

The current NCAI Chairman, Chairman Tex Hall of Three Affiliated Tribes (located in the Great Plains Region) has served two terms and cannot run again. The Tribal Leaders of the Great Plains expressed concern that someone from the Great Plains Region must follow Chairman Hall as Chairman of NCAI.

Chairman Frazier stated he “is humbled and honored by the trust placed in him by the other Chairman. There is a lot of work that needs to be done in Indian Country and electing leadership from the Great Plains Tribes to the national level is the best way to get it done, and to assure that the concerns of our Tribes and people are met.”

Chairman Crawford spoke for the nomination of Chairman Frazier, “we must take the leadership again for the Great Plains. We have a large presence and if we are going to have someone run, we need a strong force.” President Fire Thunder encouraged every Tribe in the Great Plains to participate in NCAI and the convention. She said, “NCAI is made up of the Great Plains and we need to collectively participate to make the organization stronger. The national level listens to NCAI and as such, we need to be involved to make our voices heard. We need strong leadership on the Board. I realize it is a commitment of time, energy and work, but we can make a difference for our region.”

Richard Sully, Council Representative, Yankton Sioux Tribe talked about how important it was to have leadership and a voice from the Great Plains. He said, “It was sad to say that in reality the GP Tribes lead the country in poor health, poor law enforcement, unemployment, etc. They don’t come here to the Great Plains to be part of any solution. As a Leader of our Tribe, we continue to look for help, but we are not dealt with. They are absent in our area. Because of this, we need strong support from our area, we need a strong presence. I am in favor of supporting our leaders from our region for NCAI.

President Fire Thunder spoke again that we need to change the direction of NCAI. “We need to take advantage of the power of NCAI to get work done for our region. This organization can do so much more.”

Chairman Colombe recommended that “the Great Plains Tribes come out with 100% support of our people that we select to run for NCAI.”

Chairman Crawford spoke up for Pres. Fire Thunder for Secretary of NCAI, “she is heard about throughout Indian Country.” And Chairman Crawford expressed his support for Chairman Frazier, “without a doubt, Chairman Frazier is the best candidate for President of NCAI. In the past, the Great Plains put good candidates forward and we must do so again. There is a meeting in Bismarck next month and we will take our GP resolution there and send a message out from there to all of Indian Country.”

Chairman Cayou, Omaha, said he would support the 3 candidates and he will go home to talk to his Council.

Chairman Allen, Flandreau, said, “Chairman Crawford for Treasurer, President Cecelia Fire Thunder for Secretary and Chairman Frazier for President would make very good leaders for NCAI. These guys have done hard work and team work and I will take this to Council and make sure you get out vote. I see strong leadership here and we need to move forward with this.”

Chairman Colombe said, “This draft of candidates is the best thing we can do for our region and the Tribes.”

“The GPTCA strongly endorses and supports the candidacy of these Tribal Leaders as candidates for Office in NCAI. In addition, GPTCA asks the unanimous support of other Tribes, tribal organizations and Tribal members in endorsing and supporting Chairman Frazier, President Fire Thunder and Chairman Crawford as candidates for office in NCAI.”

Baker Family Fire

Press Release: Contact: D. Alice LaClaire

Public Relations Coordinator

Phone: 605-964-4155

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe mourns recent tragedy

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe mourns the recent tragedy in which four children from the Bear Creek Community perished early Sunday morning, January 25, 2004, in a house fire that destroyed the home of D’Anna and Mike Baker.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is coordinating an effort to provide support and relief to the surviving family, including the mother, father and three surviving children. Donations of clothing, household goods, and furniture to the Mike and D’Anna Baker family may be dropped off at the Cheyenne River Housing Authority Main Maintenance Building (formerly Eberhard’s True Value), located on Highway 212 in Eagle Butte, South Dakota next to The Plains.

Cash donations may be made to the State Bank of Eagle Butte, P.O. Box 10, Eagle Butte, SD 57625, 605-964-3411, where an account has been set up for the family. Clothing donation sizes are for the three boys ages - 2, 11, and 12 are as follows: Shoes: Boys sizes 5, 6, 9, or 10, Men’s Size 10, Women’s size 9. Pants: Boys sizes 16/18, 14/16 or 14 Regular, and 2/3 Toddler, Men’s 29/30, Women’s 12/14. Shirts: Boys sizes 14/16, 12/14, and 2/3 Toddler, Men’s Large, Women’s Large.

A prayer service will be held at the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Headquarters at 2 p.m. M.T. today for all persons wishing to extend their support and prayers for the family. Any questions about donations may be directed to Jewelle Brunner, CRST Support Services at 605-964-6565, or George Eagle Chasing, Cheyenne River Housing Authority, at 605-964-4265.

Cheyenne River Leader Departs for Iraq

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release August 22, 2005

“I am proud to represent the people of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and hope to set a trail for many to follow” quoted PFC Duane Curley, United States Marine Corp. as he prepares for his journey to Iraq in September 2005. Curley is the son on Dion and Ethelene Red Dog of Eagle Butte. Currently, Duane is stationed in 29 Palms California. He first enlisted into the United States Marines on September 13, 2004 and attended basic training in San Diego, California.

Duane is one of four family members who are enlisted in the Service. He is joined by Chip Beaumister and Chad Bad Warrior, U.S. Army and Grant Hartfield, U.S. Marines. Duane comes from a long time generation of warriors. He is the grandson of the late Cecil Curley Sr. who served in the United States Army. He also has four uncles who were enlisted; Arlyn, Kenneth and Cecil Jr., U.S. Marines and Myron Curley, U.S. Army.

In high school Duane supported the Seventh Generation Youth Council. Since Duane was young he has always shown strong leadership in many areas. He developed strong work ethics at a young age and proved to be a man of character. Duane has always excelled in his positions and in his school work. Duane has a personality that draws many people young and old close to him.

Duane is a man of respect and loyalty, a true warrior from Cheyenne River. Chairman Frazier was one of many supporters who joined together at the tree of ribbons to support him for his courage and bravery. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Support group is commended for their assistance in recognizing these young warriors. Chairman Frazier stated, “Our thoughts and prayers are always with you and may the Great Spirit guide you along your journey.”

Millions Received for Cheyenne River Roads

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release August 22, 2005

Millions Received for Cheyenne River Roads

With hard work and dedication, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) and its Transportation Department has been victorious as $6 million was recently approved for CRST with the Reauthorization of the Transportation Bill. A $286.4 Billion Transportation Bill including $1.86 Billion for Indian Country was signed into law by President Bush on Aug. 10, 2005.

The Bill includes $225 M. in projects for South Dakota and $150 M. for SD Indian Reservations. There are earmarks for specific tribal projects such as $3 Million for acquisition of road maintenance equipment for Oglala, Rosebud and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. “The funding will create more jobs on the reservation, improve the safety of our roads and presents an opportunity for improved Tribal/state relationships,” said Chairman Frazier.

CRST is responsible for maintenance and repair of over 300 miles of roads on the Reservation and has listed Tribal Road Projects as ‘Special’ projects in the CRST Congressional Appropriations Priorities Book.

Every year the Tribal Administration works on the priority needs and goals from every Tribal Department. The needs are published in a document and presented to Tribal Committees. After much deliberation at the Committee level, the Tribal Council finalizes the process by passing a Resolution declaring the legislative priorities for the Tribe and publishes the Congressional Appropriations Priorities document. This document becomes the tool that the Tribal Delegation takes to meetings with Members of Congress and the Administration. This year, the CRST Council passed Resolution No. 21-05-CR delineating the priorities and the South Dupree Road or BIA Road 15, was listed as priority number 1 under the request for Tribal Roads.

We are happy to report CRST will receive $5 million for the BIA Road 15 for resurfacing between Red Scaffold and Cherry Creek to Ziebach County Road 33. Last year CRST advocated for funding for Fox Ridge Road and successfully received funding and work has begun on that road. Chairman Frazier congratulated the Tribal Employees and Tribal Council for setting goals and priorities and sticking with them in the meetings with Congress and the Administration. He said, “All our hard work is paying off.”

Other highlights of the highway reauthorization bill, SAFETEA-LU (H.R. 3) include the following:

Tribal leaders have followed and pushed the bill since 2001 to help increase Tribal transportation funding. A strong Tribal Transportation Task Force was formed which included the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the Assiniboine and Sioux tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation, the Cherokee Nation, the Colville Confederated Tribes, and the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. The Task Force did a good job of educating Congress, the state Dept. of Transportation and the administration.

CRST Chairman, Harold Frazier said, “The legislation has been a rallying point for tribal transportation departments and has empowered sovereign Tribal governments to never give up. We have many people to thank for getting so much in this Transportation Bill for CRST and Indian County, from our grassroots Tribal Transportation Task Force to our Tribal Councils to our Congressional Delegation and to members of Congress. It shows what we can accomplish when we unify as sovereign governments.”

The CRST Transportation Department will be working to design the roads and begin construction as soon as everything is in place.

MARINE - Beaumeister Departs for Iraq

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release August 02, 2005

“I will pray for you all, as you will pray for me,” said a young Marine Staff Sergeant on July 29, 2005, as he gathered among family and friends who honored him before he departs for Iraq.

Staff Sergeant, Chip Baumeister, Nape Luta (Red Hand), is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. He is currently stationed at Ft. Campbell until November of this year, and then he will be deployed to Iraq for a year.

Baumeister is the 24 year-old son of CeCe Curley-JoJola and LaVerne Curley and the grandson of LeRoy Curley of Eagle Butte. His brothers and sisters include Lee Little Wounded, Lonna Baumeister, Just Bear Eagle, and Bruce Bear Eagle. Staff Sergeant Baumeister is a 1999 graduate of Takini High School. He enlisted in the Army after graduation and has been active ever since. Baumeister is the Staff Sergeant of the E6 unit. He is currently the only member of his family to enlist in the army.

An honoring was held at the tree of yellow ribbons. An honor song was sung by Wakinyan Maza and a prayer was given by Baumeister’s grandfather, Leroy Curley, who spoke softly of his takoja (grandchild) as he addressed family and friends.

With yellow ribbons flowing in the wind, Baumeister tied his ribbon next to the ribbons of other Lakota Warrior’s who have already been called to duty in Iraq. Also present were Cheyenne River Veterans who expressed their gratitude to the Lakota warrior.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe’s Vice-Chairman, Raymond Uses the Knife and Secretary, Colette Iron Hawk presented Baumeister with a Proclamation from the tribe. “You will always be in our prayers as you make your long journey,” said Vice-Chairman Uses the Knife.

CRST Youth Coordinator Brings Soccer to Town

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605) 964-8308

07/27/2005

Rain or shine, the youth of Cheyenne River joined together at the Cheyenne Eagle Butte High School football field to learn how to play the lost game of soccer. The camp began at 9:00 a.m. with the Head Coach for Score Soccer Out Reach, Bob Lemmon from Mitchell, SD, addressing the group on the game of soccer. Lemmon has traveled around South Dakota bringing the game of soccer back to life. He was recently on the Lower Brule reservation and contacted Cheyenne River with a free of charge soccer out reach program. Soccer has never been an extra curricular activity on Cheyenne River until now. With the belief in the Youth and the Tribes new Youth Coordinator, Lynn Burnette, all sports are possible.

The weather was in the mere 70’s with flashes of rain now and again, but that didn’t stop the soccer players from having fun on the field. The Youth Diabetes Program also worked together with Burnette in many different areas. “I hung up flyers in all the communities and in town to publicize the soccer camp” said Leo Rousseau Jr., youth diabetes outreach worker. The Youth Diabetes office sent their out reach workers into the communities of Cheyenne River to transport the youth into town to participate in the camp. The program also provided fruit and water to promote the healthy eating habits that their program is actively involved in.

The camp lasted for 6 hours; for two days beginning at 9:00 a.m. and ended around 4:00 p.m. each night. Coach Lemmon stressed the importance of learning the basics of soccer before actually playing. He began with an estimate of 20 youth, both boys and girls, teaching drills by interacting with the youth in different games. By the end of the day there was an estimated 40 plus youth. One of the games involved orange cones that were made into a big square. The youth lined up with the soccer balls and began to kick there ball down the square where Coach Lemmon proceeded to kick their balls out of bounds. When their ball went out of bounds, they then joined the coach in the middle until all were knocked out.

The youth were enjoying themselves even though the weather was a bit cold. Laughs and smiles filled the field as they learned the forgotten sport of Soccer. Burnette stated, “It is very fortunate that we brought this honest and qualified out reach worker to Cheyenne River to work with our youth, he was very pleased with the attendance. I am thankful to have him here and we will invite back again soon.” Burnette also stressed his appreciation to the Youth Diabetes program for their help prior to the camp and throughout.

For more information on how to get involved with extra curricular activities for youth feel free to contact the Public Relations Office at 605-964-8308.

Senator Thune Visits IHS Hospital at Cheyenne River

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release August 02, 2005

Senator Thune arrived on Cheyenne River at 6:00 p.m. on Aug. 2, 2005. He was greeted by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Public Relations Office. Senator Thune was accompanied by Matt Zabel, Chief of Staff. The purpose of Thune’s visit was to respond to an invite from Chairman Frazier to see for himself, the Health care needs on Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. According to the ‘Report to the People’, in Jan. of 2005, Health Care for our Tribal Members is a priority set by the Tribal Council. Chairman Frazier said, “Senator Thune’s visit and discussion on our Health care needs will help him understand our situation so he can better advocate for us in Congress.”

At Chairman Frazier’s recommendation, it was arranged for the Indian Health Service staff to visit one-on-one with Senator Thune, focusing on Health Care. The Public Relations Office arranged a tour of the facilities with ample time to speak to the employees.

During the tour of the CRST Hospital; Senator Thune was greeted by Vern Donnell, (I.H.S. Chief Executive Officer and Dr. Sophie Two Hawks, I.H.S. Service Unit Clinical Director. Mr. Donnell and Dr. Two Hawks then introduced Senator Thune to their staff as they toured the hallways of the I.H.S. Through out the tour, many topics were brought to Senator’s attention. Senator listened intently as the staff talked about all the healthcare needs and explained the various reasons why CRST required funding for a new hospital.

Chairman Frazier explained the history of the CRST Hospital. When the Oahe Dam was built and old Cheyenne Agency was flooded back in 1958-59, everything was relocated to Eagle Butte. One major result of the Oahe relocation, was the loss of the hospital at Cheyenne Agency so the Corps. agreed to rebuild a new hospital in Eagle Butte which we still use in its present location even though it is about 45 years old. The Tribe has experienced problems because the hospital was built by the Corps, not the Indian Health Service. Due to this, I.H.S. would only provide funds for the CRST hospital at 46% of need which is unacceptable. The complexities of all these problems have created barriers, but the Tribal Administration has persevered in moving ahead with plans for the new Hospital.

“Unless we get additional funding in our budget, we will barely make it” stated Dr. Two Hawks. “It’s tough, we can do all that we can with what we have available, but it still isn’t enough,” stated Vern Donnell. The Eagle Butte Hospital currently has at least one to two transfers a day out to other facilities in other towns for ultra sounds, tests, Births, and other medical needs.

Since 2001, CRST no longer has OBGYN and a Birthing Unit. The population of our people is increasing and the cost is increasing because of policy shifts to Contract Health care and transporting patients away from the Reservation. Due to this Policy shift by the Dept. of Health & Human Services, the I.H.S. hospital in Eagle Butte is providing less local service. Now, People have to be transported by referrals to hospitals in Pierre, Rapid City and other places for health needs. In case of complications such as an unborn baby with a slow heart beat or any other emergency, we are unable to assist them at the Eagle Butte Hospital. Chairman Frazier has been adamant that we restore full services to the Eagle Butte Hospital and are able to handle these emergencies locally; otherwise, we cannot prevent them from turn into tragedies. Rapid City Regional Hospital is 180 miles away and our sick are being sent on this long trip in order to receive care. This is why the CRST has mandated the new hospital include OBGYN and a Birthing Unit and other medical resources to provide medical care here on the Reservation.

“If we had adequate funding for staff, we could be available on evenings and weekends to assist our people in the clinic. The people feel that if they wait out the day and come in the evening to the emergency room they will be seen faster, but this results in long hours and extra staff throughout the evenings,” continued Vern Donnell. The CRST has outlying communities and some people wait until they are deathly sick to come and be seen, which is sometimes too late. Red Scaffold, Cherry Creek on the west end and Swiftbird and White Horse communities on the East End do have Community Health Representatives which still isn’t enough to meet the needs of the field clinics. “The price for medication is also high. It isn’t your routine sniffles and colds that we are dealing with on Cheyenne River; we need all around improved service” stated Dr. Two Hawk.

Another topic was the amount of beds the hospital currently has. There are numerous beds that are not being used because of lack of staff and no flexibility to use them for our elderly. Our Elderly are forced to go to Nursing Homes off the Reservation where we are slowly losing them. The wishes of our Elderly are to be home on the reservation to pass away but because there is no place for them here, they languish away from home. Chairman Frazier explained, “this is why the Tribe has battled so hard to get out own Nursing Home here on the Reservation. The CRST is building an Elderly Village which should be in operation in the next couple of years, but until then, this is one of the problems that persist for our Elderly.”

Looking at the structure, space, color, environment of the hospital, Senator stated, “A few years ago I toured the Sisseton Wahpeton hospital and I thought that hospital was out dated, this hospital is really out dated, it is time to upgrade and build a brand new Hospital.” Chairman informed Senator Thune about all the effort the CRST has put into getting a new hospital. “In 2003, CRST wrote proposals and was awarded $ 2.3 million for site planning and preparation. In 2004, CRST again developed plans and received an additional $ 5 million for facility design and utility preparation, but there are many complications to the final development of the Hospital. One of the major difficulties impeding progress is our water issue. We can not build a new hospital with no water.” Chairman Frazier said, “I realize you (Senator Thune) are aware of this because we have been in your office several times and talked about it. We know you are working with the CRST on the water problem and for that we thank you.”

The tour came to a close with a gathering in Vern Donnell’s office for raspberry tea, meat cheese and crackers. The staff at the hospital was honored to meet the Senator and grateful for the sincerity he showed for our people. Senator Thune displayed genuine concern during his discussions and meetings with the employees. He thanked them for their commitment and dedication to the people of Cheyenne River.

Senator Thune expressed his gratitude for the doctors and pharmacist who were recruited to work in our rural area. Chairman Frazier discussed with Senator Thune the need to recruit and retain well trained doctors and Healthcare staff on the reservation. Chairman Frazier told Senator Thune, the Tribal administration is doing everything possible to bring in funding to keep professional staff at the Cheyenne River Hospital.

Roger Mayerson a contract pharmacist was introduced to Senator Thune. Roger stated, “My contract is ending soon and I wouldn’t mind making South Dakota my home, it is a remarkable state.” This brought a look of happiness to the Senator’s face to see first hand that the staff is sincere in their work to provide for the people’s health. It was also a further incentive to push for funding so professional staff could remain to continue to serve the CRST. Senator Thune expressed his gratitude for the doctors and pharmacist who were recruited to work in our rural area.

Immediately following the tour, Senator Thune and Mr. Zabel met with Chairman Frazier in his office to recap the meeting and tour. First and foremost, Senator Thune asked about the status of the Water Project. Chairman Frazier brought the Senator up to speed adding that there will be a groundbreaking soon for the construction of the road to the proposed water intake site.

After a long discussion, Chairman Frazier commended Senator Thune for his assistance and team work with Senator Johnson and Congresswoman Herseth. “Together you are sending funding down to Cheyenne River to our people and we are thankful for this and we use every cent. As a team, you are unbearable for CRST and SD.” stated Chairman Frazier. “Now the work continues on our hospital and other needs for CRST.”

Transportation Department Update: Fox Ridge Road

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605) 964-8308

8/01/2005

Under the Current activities in Chairman Frazier’s Report to the People is the paving of Fox Ridge Road. The road is slated for completion by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) in 2005-06.

In 2004, the CRST advocated for funding from Congress in the amount of $2.7 Million to pave Fox Ridge Road. After many meetings with our own SD Congressional Delegation and other Members of Congress, the United States Congress approved $2.5 Million in the 2005 Appropriations for funding for the reconstruction of Fox Ridge Road. The funding will come from the Department of Transportation Spending Bill.

Fox Ridge is a small community located a quarter of a mile south of town. The four way stop splits up Fox Ridge, Habitat road and Rodeo grounds road. For those of you who live in Fox Ridge and Habitat, you know first hand about the rough road conditions you face on a daily basis when driving down this road. Vehicle maintenance is expensive and vehicles quickly deteriorate because of the wash boards and pot holes.

Zane Arpan, Transportation Project Manager for the CRST Transportation Department is working with Brosz. Engineering and recently completed the primary design. The design will be reviewed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs area office. Phase one will be completed by fall 2005. The first phase of the design is to pave Habitat and Elk View communities. The remaining phase, which is Airport Road, Rodeo Grounds Road and Tower Hill road, will be designed and completed in the spring of 2006.

Chairman Frazier said, “the maintenance and paving of our Roads is so important to the Communities and infrastructure of the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. The Tribe has designed plans to upgrade our roads. After the plans are made and priorities set, we have to justify the design with Members of Congress so we receive adequate funding for our Transportation needs. We will continue to do this and keep the momentum going forward, so the infrastructure on Cheyenne River is improved.”

More Smoke and Mirrors for Indian People

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

7/28/2005

I read the Rapid City Journal article about the opening of the Office of the Special Trustee (OST) for American Indians in Rapid City, SD with keen interest. The article states that the office will provide services to Indian beneficiaries, including information about their Trust assets. Is this more smoke and mirrors designed to mislead Indian People?

Let me explain what this Office of Special Trustee means and why Tribes across this United States objected to the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Reorganization that led to the OST Office in Rapid City. As with any bureaucratic undertaking, the opening of the Rapid City Office did not just happen overnight, but is part of an ongoing Reorganization within Interior.

As a result of Cobell V. Norton, a nine year old claim brought by Indians against the Department of the Interior for mismanaging their trust accounts, the Department has been in the process of reorganizing the BIA for over three years now. Not only did the DOI fail to consult with Tribes on this Reorganization, but also walked away from the table when Tribes refused to acquiesce to its terms. Despite tribal opposition from across the United States, the Reorganization continued.

Cobell Judge Royce C. Lambert recently wrote, “After all these years, our government still treats Native American Indians as if they were somehow less than deserving of the respect that should be afforded to everyone in a society where all people are supposed to be equal.“ How true!

Rather than listen to Tribes and use the funds available to provide tribes with the actual assistance they need at the local level, the Department has developed a vast new bureaucracy called Office of Special Trustee (OST) that is a top-heavy organizational structure. DOI has assigned many of the services formerly provided by the BIA to the newly created bureaucracy. Unlike the BIA, there is no Indian Preference in hiring for positions within the OST. Serious computer security problems still plague the Department, even though Acting Assistant Secretary Mr. Cason testified to “ bulletproof” computer security at Interior. These problems have existed for over 20 years and there is no way the Deptartment can assure Indian Beneficiaries that their account balances are accurate. The Rapid City Trust Office is within OST, not BIA.

Tribes objected to this fragmentation of services and insisted that the services be at the agency level, where the People can get answers to questions such as realty, probate, appraisals, lease compliance, resource management planning and IIM account management. Local BIA agency offices have been reduced to mere shells of what they used to be, leaving the Agency Superintendent with little decision making power and authority.

In the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868 (15 Stat.635), Articles V and IX guarantee that the United States will provide services at the local level to our people and reimburse the Tribes for any services lost. It was clearly understood by the Indian signers of that Treaty that necessary assistance would be provided to the signatory Tribes by a local agent (or superintendent in the modern era) and that sufficient resources would be made available to the agent to allow him to discharge the duties assigned to him. Now, this new Office of Special Trustee will dominate over the regional and local agencies and circumvent the vested rights under the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty and other treaties, the cornerstone of our relationship with the United States.

The promises made in these Treaties must be upheld, and taking away the Superintendents’ authority at the local level is a violation of the Department’s legal obligations toward our Tribes. It was bad enough that our people in the communities had to travel into the Agency for assistance; now they will have to travel still further away for help. Agency Superintendents will be prevented from providing meaningful assistance at the local level creating a division of authority, resources and manpower.

It was 35 years ago on July 8, 1970 that the Self-Determination Policy was proposed. This Policy called for Tribes to take over the operation of federal programs free from the stifling controls of the federal bureaucracy. The Republican solution under President Nixon was for a smaller role for Government, that Indian Tribes be given the right to locally control and operate the federal programs that had been run for their supposed benefit by federal bureaucrats in Washington. In other words, under P.L.-638, central control by the Federal government would be replaced by local control by Tribes.

Are we witnessing a new Policy era of return to Central Control and the overturning the Self-Determination Policy? Or is this more “smoke and mirrors“ to convince Judge Lamberth and politicians that Interior is doing something no matter how much money is spent, what the Tribes recommend or what is best for Indian People?

We in the Great Plains have a very high stake in however Cobell is resolved and how reforms are implemented at the central, regional and local levels. As of July, 2001, the Great Plains Tribes held 27 % of the Individual Indian Money Accounts (over 67,000 accounts in total) more than any other region in the country. Since allotment began in 1887, over 2.6 million land transactions have been recorded in our region alone, as we hold 33 % of the nation’s trust allotments and tribal tracts (approximately 58,000 tracts). Consequently, as large land-based and direct service Tribes, the Great Plains Tribes will be hit hardest.

Great Plains Tribal Leaders reacted to protect their Rights and Land

After meetings and discussions, The Great Plains Tribes presented an alternative Plan in which a majority of Trust functions would remain at the Agency level and to fund more positions at the local level instead of a top heavy bureaucracy. This Plan was not acknowledged by Interior.

On March 18, 2004 the Tribes of the Great Plains passed a Resolution opposing any Trust Officers on the reservation, calling upon Congress for a halt to the Reorganization and directing the DOI to reprogram funding for the Trust Officers to the local Reservations where there is a greater need for services.

The National Congress of American Indians called for a halt to the Reorganization as well.

Thanks to Senators Daschle and Johnson, who listened to Tribes, on June 16, 2004, S. 2523 was introduced to “Exempt the Great Plains Region and the Rocky Mountain Region from Trust Reform Reorganization.” S. 2523 was never passed, however, limited funding to implement the Great Plains proposal was allocated during the FY-05 appropriations process. This funding is nowhere near the level necessary to make the proposal operational beyond FY-05-06.

Meanwhile, Interior continues to increase services to OST at the expense of the BIA. The Department has proposed severe cuts for Tribal Programs over objections from Tribes nation-wide. Tribes advocated against the reductions and Congress restored some of these cuts, but this pattern of budget reductions in Interior indicates that life as we know it, is changing for Indian People. Life will become more difficult for Tribal Governments and Indian People.

Some Changes are the following:

Now, the DOI has opened an office for the OST in Rapid City, SD to house their ever-increasing number of trust officers, bureaucrats whose usefulness has yet to be determined. In fact, to date, Cheyenne River has refused to accept trust officers onto the Reservation, because these positions are secondary to the immediate need for local level staff and increased support to carry out land management operations.

Again, big government is trying to tell us everything is going to be fine and this Rapid City Office will fix everything. But, the fact is, it is just more “smoke and mirrors“ with the intent to deprive (steal) our own funds from us. Smoke and Mirrors.

Harold Frazier, Chairman
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association

Contact: A. Gay Kingman, Tribal Consultant
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Phone: 605-388-5375
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Introducing the Cheyenne River Youth Little League

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

7/25/2005

The first game of the season was on July 19, 2005. Parents and spectators lined up to watch the kids play softball. The Cheyenne River Youth Little League held a skills camp first; the youth were taught softball fundamentals and we had enough players for three teams. The youth did drills that consisted of catching fly balls, fast balls and ground balls. Then they learned how to throw short and long distances. They practiced throwing into a large water bucket to straiten out their aim. They also did batting rounds and were taught how to stand, watch the ball and hit grounders and pop flies. During this Skills camp, the coaches separated the players into teams to even out the older kids and the younger kids. The ages vary from first grade to eighth grade.

The youth who missed the skills camp and who showed up to play on game day were placed on Team 4 which completed the amount of teams expected. Any youth interested in playing will not be turned away. There is always room for more.

Team 1 consists of a roster of ten players. This team currently does not have a sponsor and is coached by Lynn Burnette Jr., Cheyenne River Youth Coordinator, assisted by Jonni Hurtel. Players are Jacob LaPlante, Lachelle Eagle Chasing, Brett Fischer, Alissa Neigel, Hayden Neigel, Kastyn Carter, Trevor Laurenz, Cassy Ducheneaux, Tate Widow and KayDee Lawrence. There record is 1-1. On July 19, they lost to The Telephone Authority Bombers and on July 21, they beat Cheyenne River. “You have to be a lover of kids to be able to have the patience to work with kids; I am excited to see the smiles on the kids and the look of determination.” stated Jonni Hurtel after their first victory.

Team 2 consists of a roster of eleven players. This team “The Bombers” is sponsored by the Cheyenne River Telephone Authority. The coach of the Bombers is Clement White Dog Jr. and assisted by Jessica Kennedy. The players are East Lee, Cassidy Hollow Horn, Brexton Traversie, Shilo Ware, Rockilynn Afraid of Hawk, Nate Widow, Tucker Garreau, Andrew Bad Warrior, Crissy Ducheneaux, Erynn Ducheneaux and Tyrell Garreau Jr. The Bombers hold an undefeated record of 2-0. The first game on the 19, they beat the Braves and the second game they beat the Hot Shots. Coach White Dog said, “It’s all in the fundamentals, even adults who play by the fundamentals don’t make errors, teach them young and it will stay with them when they are older.”

Team three, the Hot Shots is coached by Rock LeBeau and assisted by Donnelle Cadotte. The roster has ten players; Brianna Pearman, Austin Meeter, Alex Meeter, Jordan LeBeau, Zachary Cadotte, Xavier Norris, Sidney LeBeau, Wyatt, Michael and Creighton. The Hot Shots record is 0-2. They were defeated by Cheyenne River and The Braves. “The Kids are developing very well and expected to win the season on a positive note,” states, Rock LeBeau, Hot Shots head coach.

Team four, Cheyenne River, consists of ten players and is currently not sponsored. Cheyenne River is coached by Jimmi Norris and assisted by Ed Norris. The players are J’Den Shaving, Chase Lawrence, Jeffery Shaving, Nevada Lawrence, Gabbi Norris, Alexa Norris, Stormy Walters, Jo’L Pretends Eagle, Jamilla Franzen and Chad Morgan. The record for Cheyenne River is 1-1. The beat the Hot Shots in game 1 and lost to The Braves in game 2. “Working with these kids takes leadership and they are fun to watch. The smiles on their faces, the laughs from the crowd and the cheers from the parents, make the league a success.” Stated Norris.

The youth league plays Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 6 and 7 p.m. If you would like to support the youth in any way or have a child who would like to join, contact Lynn Burnette Jr. or Jessica Kennedy at 365-7106. Special appreciation is sent to J.D. Williams for the donations from the Telephone Authority and to Francis Zacher, State Bank for the equipment donations. We really needed the bases and other equipment and we are putting it to full use. So bring your seeds and snacks and come and watch the youth play!

Cheyenne River Begins Road Construction

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

Moreau River Road

7/14/2005

Horrible dips, bumps, and washboard road conditions, are a recipe for a car accident waiting to happen, but a contract signed July 7, will help prevent such accidents from occurring.

“The Moreau River Road has been on the Bureau of Indian Affair’s top priority list since 1998. There have been numerous accidents as a result of the conditions and we are working continuously to fix the roads one by one,” said Chairman Frazier.

Construction on the Moreau River Road will finally begin on the 5.5 mile long road. It is one of the oldest roads on Cheyenne River and contains one of the few oldest wooden bridges left standing.

All original agreements regarding the start date for construction were signed by CRST Chairman, Harold Frazier and Jimmi Miller from the Miller Construction Company. The construction company signed a performance bond stating they will complete the road construction.

All documents governing the contract will be sent to the BIA in Aberdeen, SD where they will give notice to proceed construction on the road with in the next 20 calendar days.

Zane Arpan, Transportation Director and Tribal Project Officer said, “The project has been installed in the Transportation Department for awhile, and we have tried to hurry up the process of beginning Phase Two of road construction.”

There are four phases to complete on the Moreau River Road. Phase One has already been completed and Phase Two will follow when the BIA issues a notice to proceed. The Fourth Phase however, will be controlled by the state and county to reconstruct the bridge. Road construction will be completed once the road has undergone all four phases.

“I am glad to see we will begin construction and the project will be completed in 180 days. This will make the roads safer to travel,” said Chairman Frazier.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives $1 million Economic Development Grant

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives $1 million Economic Development Grant from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release JuLY 07, 2005

Eagle Butte, SD – The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce that the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community has gifted the Tribe with a $1,000,000.00 Economic Development grant to build a new Bingo Hall in Eagle Butte, SD. Officials from CRST met with Chairman Crooks and his staff in Prior Lake, MN on May 26, 2005, and were informed that the Tribe would qualify for an economic development grant.

Chairman Harold Frazier and DeAnna LeBeau, Tribal Planner, made the Bingo Hall presentation to Chairman Crooks and his staff. Chairman Crooks informed CRST officials that the Bingo Hall Project met their criteria for an economic development grant because the project will create jobs and stimulate the local economy.

A new Bingo Hall has been needed for quite some time. The Bingo Operation has outgrown the facility it is currently housed in. The new Bingo Hall will seat 150-200 people; have a gift shop, concession area and office space. It will also have a paved parking lot and outside lighting.

The CRST has identified two potential sites in the Eagle Butte area on which to build the new Bingo Hall. Site selection will be decided by July 22, 2005 and construction should begin by September, 2005.

The CRST is extremely grateful to the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community for their generosity and leadership. Chairman Crooks and the people of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community are successful gaming entrepreneurs and very generous in their help to other tribes. They set an excellent example of leadership for the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota people of the Great Plains. The people of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe say “Pilamaye, Mitakuye Owasin.”

Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Eldery Village

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release July 01, 2005

With the blue print of the future Elderly Village in the forefront, the Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Elderly Village kicked off June 29, with an estimated 60 attendees. The location is southwest Eagle Butte on Airport Road.

“With the efforts of the Shakopee Tribe we are able to accomplish the development of the Elderly Village,” said Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman, Harold Frazier. He thanked the Shakopee Tribe of Minnesota for their contribution and involvement. “The Shakopee Tribe has helped CRST by generously giving us a grant for $1 Million and a $3 million dollar Loan towards this project.” Chairman Frazier said “there were many people to thank since the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has been working toward a Nursing Home since 1974.” Doneen Hollingsworth, SD State Secretary of Health said, “This will be the first state-licensed, federally certified Nursing Facility on an Indian reservation.”

Honored speakers were Wisdom Keepers Director, Dana Dupris; District 4 Council Representative, Kevin Keckler; Representative from Senator John Thunes’ office, Lila Mahlhoff; Representative from Senator Tim Johnson’s office, Ellie Wicks, who read a Proclamation from Senator Johnson; South Dakota Department of Health Director, Doneen Hollingsworth; Representative from Governor Round’s office, Roger Campbell and Congresswoman Herseth sent a proclamation because her representative Ira Taken Alive was unable to attend.

Guests who attended included many of the CRST Wisdom Keepers, the city mayor, John Bachman; Tribal employees, Tribal representative from Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, Archie Fool Bear; guests from Presentation College, SD Department of Social Services, Deb Bowman and many community members. Also present was the CRST Honor Guard and Si Tanka University drum group, who sang an honor song for the opening ceremony.

The Elderly Village Ground Breaking Ceremony concluded with a prayer and ground blessing from Steve Charging Eagle, Red Scaffold resident, where all guests looked to the four directions in prayer for the development of the village.

The honors of digging fresh, ground dirt were CRST Chairman, Harold Frazier; Treasurer, Benita Clark; Secretary, Collette Iron Hawk LeBeau; Vice Chairman, Raymond Uses the Knife; CRST Vice-Chairman, Kevin Keckler; Councilwoman, Dixie LeCompte and Sharon Lee; Marcella LeBeau, elder; Elderly Village contractor and architect, SD Department of Health, Doneen Hollingsworth and a veteran.

The purpose of the village is to help provide housing for elderly and bring economic growth to Cheyenne River. “We are excited for this project to be completed so we can provide a safe and healthy way of living for our elders. The facility is primarily for Elderly Tribal Members, but this will be an open facility, not just for Indians but for everybody!” said Chairman Frazier.

The Elderly Village will provide about 60 jobs and has a target date of opening in July of 2006.

American Ba Professional League try-out to be held locally this month

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release July 11, 2005

The Gallup Talons of the American Basketball Association (ABA) will be hosting team try outs at the Middle School gym in Eagle Butte, S.D. on July 23 rd and 24 th, 2005. The goal of the Talons is to have a roster that supports Native American participation but they would like to stress that this event is open to anyone with any college experience or more. As a result, the Talons organization is encouraging any Basketball Player from the Northern Plains Region to participate in this try-out. The Northern Plains Region includes, but is not restricted to, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Minnesota and Wyoming.

The ABA is a rapidly growing organization and has recently expanded the number of teams in their league to 56 and has accepted 19 applications for the 2006-2007 Season. Each Division has been changed from 7 to 9 teams and will be named after an original ABA Legend. So far, four legends have been honored including Freddie Lewis, Marvin Barnes, Roger Brown and Spencer Haywood.

The Gallup Talons have chosen CRST Public Relations Assistant Rock LeBeau to be a Player Scout for the Northern Plains Region in order to coordinate team activities and emphasize talent searches. “I want to encourage any player with any college experience or above to attend this try-out. Every player takes a different path to realize their dreams this is just one of many. I have had limited contacts. As a result, I am encouraging all players to represent,” says Rock LeBeau.

As a reminder, this tryout will be held on July 23 rd and 24 th at Eagle Butte, South Dakota. The entry fee will be $100.00 and can be paid at the door. However, you may pay and submit your resume’ for the coach to view in advance. The address for all payments must go to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Attn: Rock LeBeau, P.O. Box 590, Eagle Butte, S.D. 57625. The Email address for resumes’ is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). If you have any questions concerning this event or lodging, you can reach Mr. LeBeau at 1-605-964- 8308 or his cell at 1-605-200-0095.

Long Awaited CRST Elderly Village to Begin Construction

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release June 13, 2005

After years of political wrangling and planning, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) is pleased to announce that it will break ground on its new 60-unit “Elderly Village” on June 29 th. The new skilled nursing facility demonstrates the Tribe’s determination to bring its elders home, as well as the cooperative spirit between the Tribe and the State of South Dakota in seeing this project through to fruition.

The vision to construct and operate a nursing home on the Cheyenne River Reservation has been in the minds of Tribal leaders for over 20 years. As Chairman Harold Frazier stated, “For too long our elderly have lived near and far, struggling to survive on what little they have, catching rides to the medical facilities on rough road conditions and battling the waiting line at the hospital, among the other difficulties they face. The elderly village will be a sacred home to all elderly and they will be taken care of by our own people and will not have to leave the reservation. Our elderly are our Wisdom Keepers and they deserve to have a place to call their own.”

Currently, the nearest nursing facilities to the Cheyenne River Reservation are located in Pierre (90 miles), Mobridge (80 miles), Gettysburg (60 miles) and Rapid City (175 miles). For decades, elderly members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe have had to move to these distant locales in order to receive skilled nursing care when their families could no longer take care of them. By the Tribe’s estimate, there are 45 Tribal members currently residing in off-Reservation nursing facilities, and 15 Tribal members living with families on the Reservation and whose physical and/or mental impairments would make them eligible for skilled nursing assistance. Additionally, there are estimated to be 15-20 non-Tribal members who would utilize the services provided in the Elderly Village.

The State of South Dakota administers all Medicaid funds in the state, including Medicaid funds paid for the care of eligible nursing home residents. Because of a perceived oversupply of nursing home beds in the state, in the 1980’s the Legislature implemented a permanent ban on the construction of any new nursing homes in the state. Although the Tribe was not legally or technically barred from constructing a nursing home by the State’s moratorium, it was fiscally prevented from doing so because the ban meant that the Tribe could not access any potential residents’ state-administered Medicaid funds to pay for the construction or operation of the facility.

In 2003, because of advocacy from the CRST, other Tribes and the Indian Legislators, the SD Legislature agreed to temporarily lift the moratorium and allow the construction of nursing homes on any of the Indian Reservations located in the state, provided that such nursing homes met certain conditions. The moratorium was only lifted until June 30, 2005. After that date, no new nursing homes can be constructed anywhere in South Dakota – not even if there is a documented need for one in a place like the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation.

Given this limited window of opportunity, the Tribe began planning an “elderly village” in the town of Eagle Butte. The elderly village will be a 60-bed facility, comprised of 50 skilled nursing units and 10 assisted living units. It will employ approximately 60 people, most of whom will be Tribal members. Construction will take approximately one year. The facility is scheduled to open in July 2006.

The elderly village would not have been possible without the generous financial assistance from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. In a recent letter to Chairman Frazier, the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Chairman Stanley Crooks commented on the relationship between the two Tribes: “Once again, the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Tribe is very happy to work with the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in its efforts to develop the Elderly Village and its reservation based economy.” Chairman Frazier is pleased to have a positive working relationship with the Shakopee Tribe: “I want to thank the Shakopee’s for helping us. It is good that we have relatives who are willing to assist our Tribe and our people in any way they can.”

The Ground Breaking Ceremony will take place on June 29, 2005 at 1:00 p.m. at the proposed site on Airport Road in Eagle Butte. The public is invited to attend.

Cheyenne River Member Victorious in Senior Olympics

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release June 17, 2005

Wally Little Moon a Bridger native, qualified for the Senior Olympics in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Little Moon is from Cheyenne River and resides in Bridger, SD. He ran in the 10k in the 55-59 age categories. Little Moon brought home the bronze medal to Cheyenne River. Little Moon stated, “I want to thank Madonna Thunder Hawk for being my number one supporter and for driving me to Pennsylvania to run. When you are at the starting line staring at the road ahead, you begin to feel overwhelmed, that’s when you look to God and ask him for strength and before you know it you’re smiling passing through the finish line.”

Little Moon trains all year around and takes his breaks in the winter months. He also ran in 1964- 1969 in track and cross country. He then went on to college at Haskell Indian Nations and ran in 1971. This is his 5th year competing in the Senior Olympics. Little Moon ran in Brookings, SD and from there he qualified to run in Pittsburg. Little moon said it was a struggle to run in Pittsburg because of the humid weather but he kept going determined to finish and win. Little Moon mentioned there were 80-90 year olds running the 6 mile run and he was amazed at the motivation they had and it inspired him to continue running and he set goals for himself to run until he no longer could. He learned a lot from his experience and said it made him stronger.

He encourages the people of Cheyenne River to stay healthy and use self discipline and anyone can change if they want to. “Running is good for all walks of life. Self discipline and determination should be an every day ambition. Develop good eating habits and don’t be lazy.” Little Moon affirmed. Little Moon was one of two Native Americans who ran in the Senior Olympics. Chairman Frazier stated, “I am supremely proud of Wally for accomplishing this as an elder. He has set in place a positive path for our young people and I am thankful our elders are strong and willing to lead by example.”

American Basketball Association Professional League try-out to be held locally in July

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release June 2, 2005

The Gallup Talons of the American Basketball Association (ABA) will be hosting team try outs at the Middle School gym in Eagle Butte, S.D. on July 23 rd and 24 th, 2005. The goal of the Talons is to have a roster that supports Native American participation. As a result, the Talons organization is encouraging all Native American Basketball Players from the Northern Plains Region to participate in this try-out. The Northern Plains Region includes, but is not restricted to, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Minnesota and Wyoming.

The ABA is a rapidly growing organization and has recently expanded the number of teams in their league to 56 and has accepted 19 applications for the 2006-2007 Season. Each Division has been changed from 7 to 9 teams and will be named after an original ABA Legend. So far, four legends have been honored including Freddie Lewis, Marvin Barnes, Roger Brown and Spencer Haywood.

The Gallup Talons have chosen CRST Public Relations Assistant Rock LeBeau to be a Player Scout for the Northern Plains Region in order to coordinate team activities and emphasize talent searches. “I want to encourage any player, from any reservation to attend this try-out. Native Americans have gone unnoticed for too long, it’s time to represent,” says Rock LeBeau.

The Northern Plains is overflowing with talent and we encourage everyone to give it a shot and try out. Basketball is a beloved game across Indian Country and we hope to see our people come near and far to participate.

As a reminder, this tryout will be held on July 23 rd and 24 th at Eagle Butte, South Dakota. The entry fee will be $100.00 and can be paid at the door. However, you may pay and submit your resume’ for the coach to view in advance. The address for all payments must go to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Attn: Rock LeBeau, P.O. Box 590, Eagle Butte, S.D. 57625. The Email address for resumes’ is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). If you have any questions, you can reach Mr. LeBeau at 1-605-964-1940 or his cell at 1-605-200-0095.

Chairman Frazier Encourages Students to be Familiar With Tribal Laws and Ordinances

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release May 16, 2005

Chairman Frazier visited the CEB Junior High Government class on Friday April 29, 2005. He began by explaining how our Tribal Government operates. He explained how the communities are split into districts and the Councilmen who live and represent the people in their district. Chairman Frazier described the Tribal election process and informed them about the number of Tribal committees that are in existence and which Members of the Tribal Government served on the committees. He told the students about The Tribal Council goals for improvement and how they works together to resolve issues that effect the Reservation.

The students had a chance to ask the Chairman questions about many government concerns. One of the popular questions was, “What do you think about the dress code that is being addressed?” The Chairman replied by explaining that a dress code would not solve the gang problems. He explained the Zero Tolerance law and told the students that he supported it and will continue to support it. There are laws in place for the people to follow for our safety. If laws are violated there are consequences. Chairman reminded them that we are all the same and we should respect and honor one another. The students expressed their thoughts on what should be done for consequences other then a dress code. First one student said the teachers should always stand in the hallways and be around in between class changes because of fights. The principle should make himself available as well to have an authority figure around to prevent fights or confrontations. Some kids don’t feel protected at school because if someone walks up to you and hits you, both parties will be suspended. The school board wants to find a solution but the solution is to enforce the rules and have more authority figures available and seen throughout the school day.

Chairman Frazier also discussed the State of the Tribe Address and allowed the students to see the issues and listen to the state that the Tribe is in and much discussion happened. He explained the structure of the Departments and how he wants to have an office in each community to assist in the basic needs of the people. Early in his campaign, the people expressed the desire to decentralize and the Tribal Administration is moving in that direction.

The students asked the Chairman what his opinion was on the Tribe if it was getting better or worse. Chairman said there is an unbelievable rise in gang activity, crime and drugs. He advised the students to become more active in sports and keep busy because they will set examples for their peers. He felt that there were not enough activities for students which lead to crime. Poverty is another reason for crime and so he explained what Tribal Ventures was working toward to decrease poverty. He told the students that, “Tomorrow is a better day.”

The students geared their questions toward youth activities. The students expressed ideas that they would like to see, such as; Youth Diabetes have more camps throughout the year as well the summer. The students would like to participate in football, swimming, cheerleading, dancing, basketball, softball and baseball. They suggested incentives for participating in these camps as in string back packs, tee shirts and recognition in the newspapers. Chairman Frazier said, “The kids don’t ask for much, just to have people work with them, listen to them and encourage them and all of us must do this.”

Lynn Burnette, Cheyenne River Youth Coordinator for the Tribe, was also present to discuss the progress he is making with activities. The first thing his position requires is a budget. He used the off season to write grants to receive money to fund these activities. Burnette was successful and now has the funding to purchase, baseball gloves, helmets, bats, balls and numerous other equipment needed to play. Burnette also has many parents who are willing to volunteer their time to work with the youth in assisting him. Burnette told the students, “I am excited to start working and get the little league together, Native American’s have so much talent that I want to help develop at a young age.” The summer little league teams will work on basic fundamentals, drills, rules and regulations and most of all playing. Burnette also plays in the Men’s League for the Lakota Thrifty Mart Falcons.

Chairman gave many words of encouragement to the students regarding the importance of education. He told the students to work hard and stay focused and set goals for themselves. He encouraged them to learn as much as they could about government and business. Also noting to further their education and to come back and help the people. There is nothing more genuine then an educated Native American especially from Cheyenne River.

Chairman Visits CEB HS Govt. Class

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release May 09, 2005

Chairman Frazier visited the CEB Junior High Government class on Friday April 29, 2005. He began by explaining how our Tribal Government operates. He explained how the communities are split into districts and the Councilmen who live and represent the people in their district. Chairman Frazier described the Tribal election process and informed them about the number of Tribal committees that are in existence and which Members of the Tribal Government served on the committees. He told the students about The Tribal Council goals for improvement and how they work together to resolve issues that effect the Reservation.

The students had a chance to ask the Chairman questions about many government concerns. One of the popular questions was, “What do you think about the dress code that is being addressed?” The Chairman replied by explaining that a dress code would not solve the gang problems. He explained the Zero Tolerance law and told the students that he supported it and will continue to support it. There are laws in place for the people to follow for our safety. If laws are violated there are consequences. Chairman reminded them that we are all the same and we should respect and honor one another. The students expressed their thoughts on what should be done for consequences other then a dress code. First one student said the teachers should always stand in the hallways and be around in between class changes because of fights. The principle should make himself available as well to have an authority figure around to prevent fights or confrontations. Some kids don’t feel protected at school because if someone walks up to you and hits you, both parties will be suspended. The school board wants to find a solution but the solution is to enforce the rules and have more authority figures available and seen throughout the school day.

Chairman Frazier also discussed the State of the Tribe Address and allowed the students to see the issues and listen to the state that the Tribe is in and much discussion happened. He explained the structure of the Departments and how he wants to have an office in each community to assist in the basic needs of the people. Early in his campaign, the people expressed the desire to decentralize and the Tribal Administration is moving in that direction.

The students asked the Chairman what his opinion was on the Tribe if it was getting better or worse. Chairman said there is an unbelievable rise in gang activity, crime and drugs. He advised the students to become more active in sports and keep busy because they will set examples for their peers. He felt that there were not enough activities for students which lead to crime. Poverty is another reason for crime and so he explained what Tribal Ventures was working toward to decrease poverty. He told the students that, “Tomorrow is a better day.”

The students geared their questions toward youth activities. The students expressed ideas that they would like to see, such as; Youth Diabetes have more camps throughout the year as well the summer. The students would like to participate in football, swimming, cheerleading, dancing, basketball, softball and baseball. They suggested incentives for participating in these camps as in string back packs, tee shirts and recognition in the newspapers. Chairman Frazier said, “ The kids don’t ask for much, just to have people work with them, listen to them and encourage them and all of us must do this.”

Lynn Burnette, Cheyenne River Youth Coordinator for the Tribe, was also present to discuss the progress he is making with activities. The first thing his position requires is a budget. He used the off season to write grants to receive money to fund these activities. Burnette was successful and now has the funding to purchase, baseball gloves, helmets, bats, balls and numerous other equipment needed to play. Burnette also has many parents who are willing to volunteer their time to work with the youth in assisting him. Burnette told the students, “I am excited to start working and get the little league together, Native American’s have so much talent that I want to help develop at a young age.” The summer little league teams will work on basic fundamentals, drills, rules and regulations and most of all playing. Burnette also plays in the Men’s League for the Lakota Thrifty Mart Falcons.

Chairman gave many words of encouragement to the students regarding the importance of education. He told the students to work hard and stay focused and set goals for themselves. He encouraged them to learn as much as they could about government and business. Also noting to further their education and to come back and help the people. There is nothing more genuine then an educated Native American especially from Cheyenne River.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal 2006 Legislative Priorities Addressed

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal 2006 Legislative Priorities Addressed Before Congress and the Administration; Government to Government

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release May 02, 2005

Chairman Frazier addressed the 2006 Legislative Priorities set by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe before our Congressional leaders and the Administration. There are many critical issues that face Cheyenne River that we are all aware of and the following is a brief summary account of what was expressed on April 18-22, 2005.

In regards to the Water Crisis, concentration was on the Preliminary Investigation Report (PIR) pertaining to the tribes water intake system. In this report, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) indicated their commitment to providing the tribe with a short term solution which will leave the current water intake system embedded in the Cheyenne River. Chairman Frazier still plans to push the USACE to move the intake out of the Cheyenne River and into the Missouri River for a permanent fix. Meetings were held with our Congressional Delegation and they remain supportive of our efforts.

To amend the restrictions in the Food Stamp Act of 1977 resulting in Federal regulations that require local median area income guidelines to determine eligibility. This affects many applicants who are in need of food assistance identifying them as ineligible. Given that the Tribal Commodity Program evolved from Treaty Rights guaranteeing rations for all Tribal members for “as long as you need them.” CRST requested an amendment which would permit the Tribe to start a pilot program for Food Distribution and to set its own eligibility guidelines for program participants based upon need. This would improve the nutritional status for residents.

The amount of General Assistance (GA) received per person is decreasing alarmingly. Under the current funding system for the BIA, GA payments to individuals in need without children are funded from the Tribal Priority Allocations (TPAs) after a base level of minimum funding is set aside for all tribes for government operations. The CRST proposes to remove such appropriations from under the TPA system and to re-instate a funding system based on need of eligible families, consistent with federal trust responsibilities.

Roads and streets are deteriorating at an accelerated pace and this has caused an increase in expenditure of construction funds to take care of maintenance problems. Chairman Frazier is determined to see positive results and has requested additional funding to our Roads Maintenance program.

Many of our children are placed in foster homes off of the Reservation, far away from their extended families. The Tribe is unable to develop a Tribal foster care program because the Title IV-E Foster Care funds come to the State, who oversees foster care for the Reservations. In 1980, when this statute was written, Tribal governments were left out of the list of entities eligible to receive funds under this federal entitlement program. As a result, only 50 of the 550 federally-recognized Tribes have been able to implement Tribal foster care programs. Chairman Frazier requested that Congress sponsor a bill to allow these funds to come directly to Tribal Social Services so the Tribes can directly access federal foster care funds and to implement their own foster care programs.

Chairman Frazier tackled the Tribe Equitable Compensation Act in discussions with Members of Congress. Under current law, only the Tribe is to receive compensation, even though much of the land taken for the Dam was owned by individual allottees. The proposed legislation would accomplish three purposes. First, the bill provides that the interest on the CRST Recovery Trust Fund would be available to the Tribe sooner than 2011. Second, the bill would provide monies in the Fund that could be used to compensate tribal member allottees who lost their lands due to the Oahe Dam (or their heirs). Third, the draft amendment solves this problem by tying the interest to the Lehman Government Bond Index, an index of Treasury and agency bonds that would leave no ambiguity.

The Native American Housing Advancement Act (NAHASDA) statute requires HUD to distribute funds through a formula that “shall be based on factors that reflect the need of the Tribes and the Indian areas of tribes for assistance for affordable housing activities.” Our reservation population continues to increase each year, but the funds for housing services is decreasing. The last piece of legislation that the Housing Authority has pushed for is to eliminate the 30% of income rule and allow for program reserves. The suggested legislation would allow and support Tribes with the opportunity to establish, manage and administer a reasonable reserve account to insure the professional operation of the necessary housing programs.

Another on going concern set by the Tribe in their Legislative Priorities and addressed by the Chairman with Congress and the Administration was the CRST Health Issues and the need for quality care. The current resources including Personnel, Budget, Ambulances, Building, Staff Housing and Dispatch were all areas that are in need of funding. Additionally, the Chairman pushed for the Cheyenne River Service Unit Recruitment and Retention Program Demonstration Project Reauthorization Request.

Chairman Frazier sought amendments to the Indian Financing Act that would direct the Secretary of the Interior to promulgate guidelines, under which, Non-conventional lenders would be able to participate in the Indian Financing Act programs. He also proposed an amendment to the Indian Financing Act, to allow for the implementation of the Indian Financing Act programs in Tribe to Tribe lending.

Last but not least, the Legislative Priority the Chairman addressed with Congress and the Administration was the Veterans Program Funding. CRST recently acquired grant funds to build a Veterans Service Center to assist over 300 Veterans living on the Reservation. The Tribe has over four million invested in the implementation of this program. The Tribe now needs educational opportunities, medical coverage, and military retirement information. The Veterans Program staff would also assist approximately 100 Tribal members currently on active duty in all branches of the Armed Services.

In conclusion, Chairman Frazier stated, “The 2006 Legislative Priorities were established by Tribal Committee and passed by Tribal Council. I presented these goals for 2006 in the State of the CRST Address in a published document. These Priorities became our marching orders to address with Members of Congress and the Administration. If, the Tribe is not in the ‘arena’ educating and pushing for our needs, we will surely fail and we cannot risk any less for our People. In my meetings in Washington DC, I am inviting Congressional Members and the Administration to visit CRST so they see our conditions for themselves.”

Chairman Frazier’s Successfully Testifies before Congressional Appropriations Sub Committee

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release April 25, 2005

On April 14, 2005 in a round table sub-committee hearing, Chairman Harold Frazier testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies regarding the fiscal year 2006 budget. Only thirty Tribal Leaders were selected to provide both written and verbal testimony.

In addition to written testimony highlighting CRST appropriation priorities and special projects, Chairman Frazier also submitted the CRST Appropriation Packet and respectfully asked Congress to protect and increase the funding levels for Native Americans especially those areas that are most impacted by poverty.

Among his comments directly to the Sub-Committee, Chairman Frazier discussed that the Tribe is forced to deal with the BIA budget process and it is not working for us and has our Tribe fighting against other Tribes for funding. The money is not going where it is needed and is dispersed through formulas which have created disparity in Indian Country. Chairman Frazier believes that the formulas need to be re-examined and they must be based on need.

“The BIA and IHS have us traveling all over the country chasing the pot of money at the end of the rainbow. We all know there is no end to a rainbow,” Chairman Frazier declared. “I come here today asking you to honor our treaties. Our ancestors, when they signed the treaty, they smoked the cannupa and they swore to uphold these treaties,” he continued as he asking the committee to honor the treaties and stand behind their ancestors signatures as our people stand behind our ancestor’s words. “In our treaties,” he continued, “there were agreements made, where the U.S. government agreed to provide us with education, health, agricultural resources, welfare, and help us to build our economy. Yet today, these entitlements are being separated and manipulated into discretionary services which can be exterminated at the stroke of a pen.”

His testimony also emphasized the slow deterioration of our land as it is overrun by prairie dogs and rodents. Chairman Frazier stated, “There are no resources and authorities at the local agency level to better manage our lands. There is no relief form the BIA or DOI, who are the caretakers of our trust lands. There are limits on their responsibilities to that of financial management of income from trust lands.” His comments also brought attention to the development of the Office of Special Trust, “to continue with the development of the Office of Special Trust will cause harm to both Indian landowners and Tribal governments because we are the ones who are being sacrificed to fund a new and unnecessary bureaucratic department,” he testified.

His testimony continued, “We receive 4.1 million for direct care for our hospital and clinics, when pro rated to each of the 7,092 patients that utilize the hospital; it averages $588.00 per patient per year.” His comments turned to the issue of diabetes. “Millions of dollars are being appropriated but it is not put at the level where the diabetics are, over twenty-six million is held back at the central and regional levels. The funds come in forms of grants and are for research and we have been researched to death. It is time that these findings from the research are funded to cure the disease of diabetes.” Chairman Frazier asked, “Where do the diabetics go when the grants run out of funding?” His testimony brought attention to the need for recurring funds to provide basic health care services. In addition, his comments discussed that appropriations have not kept pace with the needs of CRST growing population and the program budgets are salaries and fringe only. He stressed the fact that there is no money for essential services, training and equipment.

Lastly, Chairman Frazier commented on the two percent budget cut for the entire BIA budget that has been mandated by top BIA official for fiscal year 2006. “Our tribe cannot absorb these cuts; they are not cuts but amputations of basic services. History shows that the local agency level budgets shrink and the central office and regional office budgets grow. The increases need to go out into Indian Country where the majority of Indians live in poverty,” Chairman Frazier testified.

In closing, Chairman Frazier advised the committee that, “Many of our people don’t have much, but they do have a prayer. We as a Tribe pray that that the United States Government will honor our treaties.”

MNI Waste on Cheyenne River

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release April 21, 2005

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier reacted with mixed emotions today to the announcement by the Army Corps of Engineers that they are committed to doing a temporary solution relative to the looming water crisis facing 17 communities in Dewey, Ziebach and Meade Counties in North Central South Dakota.

The Corps announced yesterday that they will begin design of a temporary intake four miles further down the Cheyenne River from the existing pump station and will build it if necessary.

“While I am most appreciative of the support we have received from the Congressional Delegation and the Corps of Engineers on this and while we are relieved that the Corps is committed to a plan that will ensure we don’t run out of water this summer, there are some definite problems with any plan that continues to rely on the Cheyenne River as a source of drinking water. It is silting in at a rate that is many times faster than all previous Corps’ predictions and the silt in that body of water is full of chemicals that we are convinced are causing very serious diseases among our people, including high incidences of Glioblastoma, Scleroderma and Lupus at rates that are many times higher than the incidence those diseases exist in this country. Unfortunately, any plan that relies on the Cheyenne River is probably going to guarantee we continue to suffer from these problems. We hope the Congress will examine this plan and provide direction to the Corps that will include moving the intake to the main stem of the Missouri River which is really our only viable long term solution,” he said.

Late yesterday, tribal representatives, including the Director of Tribal Housing Authority, made officials at the Corps’ headquarters aware of the some of the problematic environmental consequences of a plan that would rely too heavily or for too much longer on the Cheyenne River as a source of drinking water, pointing to data including the fact that there have been 18 cases of brain cancers including 11 deaths since 1996 in a user population of 11,583 people according to Indian Health Service data. The national incidence of brain cancers ranges from 3.5 to 6 per 100,000 according to the National Cancer Institute. There have also been 7 cases of Scleroderma including four deaths on the reservation since 1996 whereas the incidence of those cases in the US population is 1 in 100,000.

Leadership in Corps headquarters then directed staff in the Northwest Division to examine this and other matters further during the design phase of the process. Tribal officials expressed great appreciation to the Corps for directing that this matter be examined in more detail and indicated a desire to return to South Dakota to begin working with staff from the Omaha District offices who have been so very helpful to date.

For more information contact:

Wayne Ducheneaux (605) 365-7030

Rebecca Kidder (605) 365-7121

The CRST and its Relationship to Si Tanka University

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release April 04, 2005

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government and its Tribal Administration fully support the efforts of Si Tanka University (STU) to remain in operation. Tribal leaders are very concerned about what is happening to the students and employees of STU.

There has been much misunderstanding in the media about the relationship between the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and STU. The relationship indeed appears complex to those unfamiliar with Tribal governmental operations. Therefore, Tribal leaders feel that the governance of STU must be explained.

Si Tanka University has two charters under which it operates. One of the charters was issued by the Tribe in 1973. It has undergone several changes, but in essence provides that the University Board of Regents is comprised of 6 Members - 3 appointed by the CRST Council and 3 elected at large from among Tribal members. The Board acts autonomously from the Tribal Government and has authority to carry out all provisions of the Charter.

Other than the appointment of 3 Board Members, the Tribal Council has little authority over either the long term planning or day-to-day operations of STU. The Charter states that the college must provide a monthly report on the general condition of the college to the Council. When the college desires to amend its charter, its Board of Regents must initiate any change. Although the Tribal Council has authority to review and approve charter amendments once passed by the STU Board, the Council has no authority to unilaterally amend the college’s charter. If the Tribal Council becomes aware of certain default conditions, and those conditions remain uncorrected for a period of time, the charter allows the Council to dissolve the charter.

The Council’s authority to approve charter amendments and even dissolve the charter is a power commonly reserved to governments, and is seen in other governments’ corporate codes, including the State of South Dakota’s corporation code. As with any government, the power to amend or dissolve corporate charters is not a power the Tribal Government exercises often or without justification.

Likewise, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government has little authority over the day-to-day affairs and operations of the other, State chartered, Si Tanka University. As a state chartered entity, this corporation must comply with all South Dakota state corporation laws.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has always and will continue to fully support the efforts of STU and its Board of Regents to provide higher education for all those who seek to improve their lives through post-high school studies. However, the Tribe has no plans to intervene in the day-to-day operations of the college. The Tribe defers to the insight and vision of STU’s Board of Regents, who have been selected by the Tribal Council and by Tribal members, to chart the best long term path for the college, its students and faculty.

In its concern for the students and employees of STU, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe attempted to lend the college money and ease the institution’s dire financial condition. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is under no obligation to lend this money – it did so because it cares about the welfare of all STU employees and students, and because it saw a need to respond to requests for financial assistance from STU administrators. However, the Tribe’s status as STU’s lender imparts no more authority over STU affairs to the Tribal Council than it would to any other of the college’s lenders. The Tribe is acting just as any other lender would in our relationship with STU. And, until STU resolves the issue of the IRS levy, the Tribe cannot and will not lend STU any money.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council will again take up the issue of STU’s financial crisis this week during its regular April session. The Tribal Government is well aware of all the concerns and myriad of problems surrounding the college, as well as the vital role it plays both on and off the Cheyenne River Reservation. Whatever the outcome, you can be assured the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government will not take its actions lightly.

Chairman Frazier Will Testify To the House Committee on Appropriations

Chairman Frazier Will Testify To the House Committee on Appropriations for the Fiscal Year 2006 Budget

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release April 04, 2005

Chairman Frazier has been notified that he is one of 30 tribal leaders nation wide who has been selected to testify before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies in Washington D.C. on April 14, 2005. This is an important opportunity for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe as it will ensure that Congressional Representatives are aware of our appropriation priorities and recommendations.

Chairman Frazier recognizes that this is a rare opportunity extended to a handful of the nation’s many tribal nations. He will utilize this hearing to be a witness on behalf of the members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe regarding the desperate conditions impacting our reservation. His testimony will focus on encouraging the Congressional leaders to protect and increase those federally funded programs including targeted BIA and I.H.S. services slated for funding cuts by Bush Administration as well as requesting special appropriations for projects needed on Cheyenne River.

Chairman Frazier has repeatedly reminded tribal members that “the money isn’t here it’s in Washington” and it is with invitations of this stature that he will be able to work toward increasing federal appropriations. Increased funding for our tribal government will have a positive impact on our families, communities and the Tribe.

Separation of Si Tanka University from Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release April 04, 2005

The Tribal Council and Tribal Administration fully support the efforts of Si Tanka University to remain in operation, but the Tribe has no plans to intervene in the day to day operations of the college. The Tribe defers to the insight and vision of the college’s board of directors-who have been selected by the Tribal Council and the Tribal membership for their knowledge of and dedication to the college to chart the best long term path for the college, its students and faculty.

The Council’s authority to approve charter amendments and even dissolve the charter is a power commonly reserved to the governments, and is seen in other government’s corporate codes, including the State of South Dakota’s corporation’s code. It is not a power the Tribal government exercises often or without justification.

Si Tanka University has two charters under which it operates. One of the charters was issued by the Tribe in 1973. It has undergone several changes, but in essence provides that the university board is comprised of six members. Three appointed by Council and three elected at large form among Tribal members. The board acts autonomously from the Tribal government and has authority to carry out all provisions of the charter.

Other than the appointment of three board members, the Tribal Council has little authority over the long term planning or day to day operations of the college. The charter states that the college must provide a monthly report on the general condition of the college to the Council. When the college desires to amend its charter, it must present any such changes to the Council for review and approval. If the Tribal Council becomes aware of certain default conditions, and those conditions remain uncorrected for a period of time, the charter allows the Council to dissolve the Charter.

The Tribal government has even less authority over the affairs and operations of the State chartered Si Tanka University. As a state chartered entity, this corporation must comply with all State corporation laws.

Group Calls for Congress to Ensure Water Not Cut Off and Avoid Disaster

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release March 28, 2005

Today, at a meeting in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, a group of American Indians, farmers, ranchers, small town mayors, health care providers, firemen, teachers, businessman and just plain citizens called on the South Dakota Congressional Delegation and their colleagues in the House and Senate to take necessary actions to ensure that the drought – combined with an aging water system – doesn’t combine this summer to shut off water to 14,000 residents of northwestern South Dakota in a geographical area the size of Connecticut.

“You’ve heard of a two-headed monster?” queried Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier. “Well ours has three heads! We have a water system that is breaking down and only has a capacity of 1.2 million gallons a day when it is working. We have a drought which is going to result in Oahe pool going below the level of our intake valve and finally, we have an intake that, having been lowered once already, is now close to be silted in. The silt covering this area is contaminated with arsenic, heavy, metals and mercury. We face a crisis this summer that is unimaginable. It will affect Indians and non-Indians, on-reservation and off reservation communities. It is a drought emergency and an environmental emergency. Ziebach County is the fifth poorest county in the United States. Dewey County is the 78 th poorest county in the United States. We are talking about an extremely vulnerable population of people, who do not have the resources to simply move or even to get to water distribution points.”

Tensions ran high as the critical water shortage was discussed. Glen Haines, the Mayor of Faith, SD, said, “My town is over 100 miles away from the intake pipe on the Cheyenne River. The pipe from that intake then goes through Eagle Butte and heads due west to Faith. It is critical that the intake be moved and a larger pipe and treatment facility be built. We cannot wait any longer – this situation is critical. If the Congress can meet in special session all weekend to save one life, I am sure they can meet in time to save the 14,000 lives at risk here in South Dakota.”

John McGinness, Dewey County Commissioner stated, “this is a more serious problem than what people think and we need to deal with it.”

John Ganje, City of Eagle Butte said, “Someone needs to prioritize the Master Manual, We’ve got 40 people on Dialysis, they need first priority in case of emergency”

Background

Even if the intake doesn’t go out of the water this summer 99% of the current system is at or above maximum capacity. Emergencies already exist:

When the water goes out completely, which is predicted to happen this summer, there will be an even more severe crisis:

The assembled representatives of an area covering over 4,800 square miles expressed their appreciation to the Army Corps of Engineers whose representatives are coming for a visit tomorrow. It is the concern of the group that under existing authority, the Corps will only be able to move the intake a few miles further out into the mouth of the Cheyenne River. This may get the affected communities through the summer but it won’t fix the problem.

The group jointly signed a letter to Senators John Thune, Tim Johnson and to Congresswoman Stephanie Herseth urging specific Congressional actions to pursue two tracks:

First, to get language into the FY 06 Energy and Water Appropriations bill directing the Corps to use the authority found in 33 USC 701n, Emergency Response to Natural Disasters, to move the intake into the main stem of the Missouri (and out of the Cheyenne River) and to install the necessary pumps, water transport pipeline, and treatment facilities to get water to Eagle Butte. The group indicated their understanding that this is a larger project than is normally done by the Corps under this authority but indicated that an extraordinary situation requires an extraordinary response and they hoped the Congress and the Corps would be both understanding and innovative. The Banner Engineering firm of Brookings has completed a technical study specifying how this can be done. It will cost $76 million.

The second request of the group to the Congressional Delegation was to secure language in this year’s Water Resources Development Act (WRDA 2005) authorizing a wider and better distribution system. The signers of the letter pointed to Section 219(f) of WRDA, as having been used in various parts of the country for “Environmental Infrastructure” projects including water systems and pointed out that, as with 33 USC 701n, the authority exists if the Congress warrants this important enough to use it. The group acknowledged that the larger system would need authorization through WRDA and couldn’t qualify under 33 USC 701n.

“We simply can’t wait any longer or these communities won’t survive,” said John Bachman, Mayor of Eagle Butte, South Dakota. “We have examined various alternatives and this approach is clearly the best way to serve the thousands of people affected by this water system. We pray our Delegation and the Committee Chairmen who will decide these things understand how critical the situation is in this area. We have to do something right now,” he concluded.

The meeting concluded with everyone in agreement to present a united front to get this situation resolved.

For Further Information please contact the following people:

Chairman Harold Frazier,
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Phone: 605-388-5375

Wayne Ducheneaux, Director
Cheyenne River Housing Authority
Phone: (605) 964-426

Upcoming Community Events Planned

Introducing the Cheyenne River Youth Little League

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release March 24, 2005

Chairman Frazier will be visiting all reservation communities to give a report to the people of Cheyenne River. A meal will be served at each meeting.

The report is a follow up from the “State of the Tribe Address”. In the report the Chairman informed the public that he would visit the people in their communities. This report took a total team effort and it is the goal of this administration to assist the Chairman in his vision to accomplish the goals outlined in the People’s Platform. The support given this administration is greatly appreciated as it motivates us to continue moving forward. We strongly believe that unity is essential to ensure success which will benefit the Tribe as a whole. Within the Tribal organization, all departments bring their talents and abilities together to work towards achieving the goals and objectives. No one man can accomplish this task alone. As Chairman Frazier stated, “You are only as good as the people you surround yourself with.”

In conclusion, we invite the public to attend a meeting near you. Below are the dates Chairman Frazier will be in your area.

Time-Date-Location

7:00p.m. April 12, 2005 Cherry Creek

7:00p.m. April 26, 2005 Dupree

7:00p.m. April 27, 2005 Bridger

7:00p.m. May 10, 2005 Iron Lightning

7:00p.m. May 17, 2005 Bear Creek

7:00p.m. May 12, 2005 Thunder Butte

7:00p.m. May 16, 2005 Takini

7:00p.m. May 18, 2005 Red Scaffold

7:00p.m. May 23, 2005 Swiftbird

7:00p.m. May 24, 2005 Black Foot

7:00p.m. May 25, 2005 Laplante

7:00p.m. May 31, 2005 Green Grass

7:00p.m. June 1, 2005 Timber Lake

7:00p.m. June 2, 2005 Isabel

7:00p.m. June 21, 2005 White Horse

Condolences to Red Lake

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Rock LeBeau (605)964-8308

For immediate release March 22, 2005

Harold Frazier, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe issued the following statement:

As, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, I extend our heartfelt sympathy and condolences from the Tribal Council and the Minicoujou, the Itazipco, the Sihasapa and the Oohenumpa People of Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, for the tragic loss of lives and those injured, yesterday.

We are reminded of the fragility of life and the significance of our Young. We share in your mourning and know as Indian people we are not immune to such disastrous events that happen nation-wide.

Such tragedies remind us that we need to love our children and help our youth as much as we can. We need to give assistance and love to the families of all concerned. As American Indians and Tribal People, it is our responsibility to learn from such unfortunate events and seek how we can heal and rehabilitate our families and communities.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe respectfully offers our prayers and thoughts to the Red Lake Chippewa as you pass through this sorrowful time. May the Great Spirit bless each and every one of you and bring you comfort and strength.

Harold Frazier, Chairman,

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

False Promises and Reneged Agreements by the BIA Will Force Closure of Si Tanka University

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Jessica D. Kennedy (605)964-8308

For immediate release March 4, 2005

A series of false promises and reneged agreements by Dr. Ed Parisian, the Director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Office of Indian Education Programs (OIEP), will result in the closure of Si Tanka University, according to University and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal leaders. The University is a driving force in the Eagle Butte and Huron, South Dakota, communities. With the loss of employment for 191 people and the loss of educational opportunities for 775 students, most of them Native Americans, the closure of Si Tanka University will devastate both rural South Dakota communities.

A vital source of funding for the University comes from federal monies called “471 funds,” which are administered through OIEP and are allocated to Tribal colleges based on Indian student enrollment. After OIEP’s denial of the University’s receipt of 471 funds, CRST Chairman Harold Frazier and University President Francine Hall met with Parisian in Washington, D.C. in January. At that meeting, the University and OIEP reached an agreement that would have ensured the University’s operation through the 2005 academic year: both parties agreed that the Eagle Butte campus of STU would receive 471 funds immediately based upon its Indian student count, and that OIEP would conduct a site visit of STU’s operations in early February in order to determine whether the University’s Huron campus Indian students are eligible for 471 funds.

In reliance on the agreement reached at the January meeting, University officials believed that there would be sufficient funding to keep the doors of the University open through the spring semester. However, after several weeks of unsuccessfully attempting to access the promised funds, Parisian told University officials on Wednesday that OIEP had changed its mind and is now not going to release any 471 monies to the University. Not only did Parisian renege on his January agreement, but he also refused to put such denial in writing, in an apparent attempt to avoid a legal appeal of his decision by the University. When University officials attempted to solicit more information from Parisian about his decision to deny 471 funds, Parisian repeatedly evaded questions before abruptly hanging up on the telephone call.

“Ed Parisian is a liar and dishonorable. He is a threat to Indian Country. He had no authority to abrogate our Treaties, yet he is doing just that. He should be ashamed to call himself an Indian,” Chairman Frazier exclaimed after learning of the University’s imminent closure. “The BIA needs to remember that they exist because of Tribes. It is sad to see that instead of working to promote Tribal colleges, OIEP is working to close them. First it was DQ University, and now it’s us – who will be next? Ed Parisian is an embarrassment to the President and his administration.”

Other tribes in the Great Plains Region have experienced similar mistreatment and disrespect at the hands of Parisian. In March 2004, after numerous broken promises and unprofessional treatment by Parisian, the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association membership passed a resolution calling for Parisian’s resignation “because of his lack of effort in building a relationship with the Great Plains Region Tribes for the betterment of Indian children’s education.”

University President Francine Hall is dismayed that OIEP officials display no apparent understanding of Tribal sovereignty or the modern-day Tribal educational institutions that they are charged with serving. In a teleconference with Hall earlier this week, OIEP official Sharon Wells was surprised to learn that Tribes have sovereign authority to issue charters for the creation of Tribal colleges, even though a Tribally issued charter is a requirement under the federal Tribally Controlled College or University Assistance Act. “It is extremely disheartening and disturbing that Tribal members, and especially aspiring Indian students, have to suffer the consequences of the BIA’s ignorance of Tribal sovereignty. If OIEP doesn’t understand Tribal sovereignty or how Tribal educational institutions operate, then how can we expect them to carry out their trust duties?” Hall further declared, “OIEP has erred in their decision. If they would have followed through with their promise to fund the Eagle Butte campus and conduct a site visit to learn about our operational structure, we would not be forced to close.”

Tribe Receives $1.5 Million to Pave and Curb China Town Street

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Jessica D. Kennedy (605)964-8308

For immediate release March 21, 2005

A new road for China Town is long over due. There are many pot holes and breakage on the current street that causes the road to be a road less traveled, except by the residents.

Dakota Longbrake, Director of Transportation, has many projects lined up and China Town will be one of the first to receive improvement. The street will be completely paved and curbed from beginning to end. The Tribe acknowledges Bear Creek and Dupree Road as priority roads on the Reservation. 1.5 million would merely dent the two road projects and China Town falls right under the amount we received. Lobbying efforts for 2006 were made by Chairman Frazier and Dakota Longbrake. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) is just beginning to see the positive outcomes of that lobbying.

President Bush in the Administration Budget, has over 139 million plus in cuts. This is a very hard hit to Indian Country. Herseth, Thune and Johnson have been more then cooperative with our appropriations requests. President Bush intends to cut the budget in half by 2010. All tribes, especially the CRST, must be at the table armed with the best budget information and data to be included. It is very important we participate and be active at meetings so we are at the top of the list when it comes to receiving funding.

The transportation funding was secured through the efforts of Representative Herseth in HR 3, as amended by the House Report 109-12. This is a report accompanying the “Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users”. The money will be used to pave and curb Rt. 900, China Town Streets. Unless this is challenged in the Senate, the earmark should stand once the final bill is passed. Chairman Frazier stated, “Thank you Rep. Herseth, the CRST, Department of Transportation is well prepared to begin construction on the new road.”

Latest Release on State of the Tribe Address

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

Chairman Harold Frazier, of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe will address the people of Cheyenne River on 26 January 2005, at what is to be the first ever State of the Tribe Address. The event will take place in Eagle Butte at the high school auditorium at 6:00 p.m. (MST). There will be many notable speakers and a dinner will follow. For those that will not be able to attend, KLND will air the event live on FM 89.5.

“It is time to move forward and continue the fight for our people to live and build towards a better world for our children, grandchildren, and future generations”, said Frazier during his Inauguration in December of 2002. The Chairman, with the support of Tribal Council and his staff, has since made some remarkable achievements for the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation and has distinguished himself as a strong voice throughout Indian Country as well.

Because he believes the people have a right to know what their Tribal Government is doing, Chairman Frazier vowed “he would improve communication between his office and the public.” Now, the Chairman will deliver a report to the citizens of Cheyenne River on the progress the Tribe has made locally, regionally, and on the national level. The State of the Tribe Address will include updates on current developments within the Tribe and the Chairman’s plans for future projects and what he hopes to achieve. “I will not stop with these accomplishments, we have made progress, but there is more to do”, stated Frazier.

Historic State of the Tribe Address

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

12/06/04

Chairman Harold Frazier, of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe will address the people of Cheyenne River on 26 January, 2005 at what is to be the first ever State of the Tribe Address. There will be many notable speakers and a dinner will follow.

“It is time to move forward and continue the fight for our people to live and build towards a better world for our children, grandchildren, and future generations”, said Frazier during his Inauguration in December of 2002. He has since made notable impacts on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation such as; overseeing the development of a movie theatre, increased the minimum wage for Tribal employees, also increased the school clothing grant, and has obtained funding for a reservation wide transit system, a new hospital, a nursing home, and a veteran’s center just to name a few. “Many have worked hard on these undertakings to make life better for the people of Cheyenne River. . ., we have proceeded in an honorable way with our goal of positive solutions”, said Frazier.

Not only has Chairman Frazier distinguished himself as a leader locally, his efforts have proven him a strong voice throughout Indian Country. Frazier also serves as Chairman of the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association (GPTCA), and is a Regional Vice-Chairman for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI). Under his leadership, GPTCA passed resolution to work on a Region specific plan to address Trust Reform. Because of this the Great Plains Tribes will receive 15 additional full time equivalent employees and $1,825,000 provided to BIA at the agency level. Congress has directed the Secretary of Interior to work with the Great Plains Tribes to determine the use for these added resources. This is a remarkable achievement for Tribes in the Great Plains Region. Currently he is pursuing change within the Indian Health Services and seeking funding to develop programs within Tribal law enforcement.

Frazier’s involvement in these organizations ensures that CRST has a voice on issues that affect the well-being of all Native Americans and allows Tribes to proceed in unity to achieve greater success.

Because he believes the People have a right to know what their Tribal Government is doing, Frazier vowed “he would improve communication between his office and the public.” Now, the Chairman will deliver a report to the citizens of Cheyenne River on the progress the Tribe has made locally, regionally, and on the national level. The State of the Tribe Address will include updates on current developments within the Tribe and the Chairman’s plans for future projects and what he hopes to achieve. “I will not stop with these accomplishments, we have made progress, but there is more to do”, stated Frazier.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Makes Progress on Movie Theater

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

10/6/04

Six months ago, the government class from the Cheyenne Eagle Butte High School had the opportunity to actively participate in the planning of the Tribe’s movie theater during a special session of Tribal Council. “We listened to the students’ suggestions in planning the theater and as a result the Tribe intends to show first rate movies and will be offering discount nights and other special deals,” stated Chairman Harold Frazier. The theatre will also house a coffee shop and deli that would create positions for one full time manager and up to ten part-time employees depending upon the amount of business. “Students would be ideal to fill these positions,” said Frazier.

The Theater will be located in Downtown Eagle Butte where an old garage sat since the early 1900’s. The garage has recently been removed through the efforts of CRST’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The Tribe is taking every precaution in the development of the building and to make sure there are no hazardous materials in the ground the soil is being removed and will be refilled with clean dirt. Meanwhile, the architect has been very busy designing the building and once the Tribe reviews and approves of the plans they will be able to proceed with construction. “Today, we are closer to reaching our goal of building the movie theater and providing jobs,” said Frazier. Frazier also commented on the hard work of Tracey Fischer, (CRST attorney) who has been instrumental in the progression of developing this much needed entertainment for the youth.

The Tribe had originally hoped construction on the movie theater could begin this fall, however site preparation and the business plan has taken longer than expected. The new target date for construction is early spring with a grand opening expected in the summer of 2005.

November 2004 General Election Results

DISTRICT 1
Steve Moran defeated Bryce In the Woods (incumbent) for the seat of Council Representative.

Burton In the Woods, Sr. defeated Bradley C. Taylor for the seatof District Chairman.

Kimberly (Rave) Red Bear won the seat of District Secretary.

DISTRICT 2
Ted Knife, Jr. defeated Burtis White Wolf for the seat of Council Representative.

Manny Iron Hawk won the seat of District Chairman.

No candidates for District Secretary.

DISTRICT 3
Maynard Dupris defeated Sylvester Waloke for the seat of CouncilRepresentative.

June Runs After defeated Ivan Bruguier for the seat of District Chairman.

Shantoya Waloke won the seat of District Secretary.

DISTRICT 4
Terrance Veo and Sharon Lee defeated Arlee F. High Elk (incumbent) and Frank Thompson (incumbent) for the seats of Council Representatives.

Richard Red Elk won the seat of District Chairman.

Alvina B. Hump defeated Patricia Red Fox for the seat of District Secretary.

DISTRICT 5
Lanny LaPlante (incumbent) and Corbin LeBeau, Sr. defeated Melvin Garreau, Sr. (incumbent) and Joe Brings Plenty for the seats of Council Representatives.

M. Jay Cook won the seat of District Chairman.

No candidates for the seat of District Secretary.

DISTRICT 6
Dixie LeCompte defeated Zachary Ducheneaux (incumbent) for the seat of Council Representative.

No candidates for District Chairman.

Colette Shaving won the seat of District Secretary.

BOARDS ELECTED
DISTRICT 3
TAKINI SCHOOL BOARD
Sullivan White Wolf, Sr. defeated Manny C. Iron Hawk, Gloria Sitting Crow and Geraldine Condon for the seat of Takini School Board member representing Red Scaffold.

Al Lone Eagle defeated Michael Longbrake and Sullivan White Wolf, Jr. for the seat of Takini School Board member representing Bridger.

Pam Afraid of Hawk defeated Delores N. Curley, Irene Traversie, September Waloke and April Waloke for the seat of Takini School Board member representing Cherry Creek.

CRST leading the Initiative on Addressing the Poor Quality of Health Care in Indian Health Services

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

10/4/04

A strong advocate for health care issues involving Indian Health Services, Chairman Frazier is taking the lead to stand up to IHS.

Frazier invited Tribal Leaders and Health Care Directors in the Great Plains Region to a Tribal Health Summit on the 8th and 9th of October, 2004 in Rapid City, SD. The Summit is a follow up to the recent gathering with Tribal Leaders and Senator Tom Daschle. The purpose of this meeting is to address the crucial problems that Tribes are facing with IHS, unify to find solutions, and construct a game plan for the next Congressional Session in January of 2005.

“We’re all experiencing the same problems and it is time to unite to find the solutions,” stated Frazier, “We can no longer tolerate the denial of critical services to our members.”

In May of this year the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe said, “Enough is enough,” and took official action to assist Tribal Members to bring malpractice suits against IHS, change the policies and practices of IHS, and held public hearings to gather testimony against IHS. Chairman Frazier declared,“Our people can no longer tolerate the physical and emotional suffering caused by the policies and practices of Indian Health Services.”

This gathering will be the first step in taking action to end the mistreatment of Tribal Members. “We have the knowledge and resources amongst us to take action,” said Frazier.

Decentralizing With a 477 Plan

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

10/6/04

Decentralizing Tribal government services is a major issue on Chairman Frazier’s agenda. Frazier has been working hard to identify resources that would allow for the creation of field offices in outer-lying communities which would provide services and employment on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation.

Public Law 102-477, the Indian Employment, Training, and Related Services Demonstration Act of 1992 permits Tribal governments to consolidate programs that are currently federally funded into a single coordinated comprehensive program. The Tribe is developing a plan, referred to as the 477 Plan, in accordance with this legislation. “I am responding to the urgent need of our people to access services and employment opportunities in the communities they live in,” stated Chairman Frazier. This plan would allow the Tribe to integrate programs such as classroom training, work experience, on-the-job training, youth employment, career services, employment incentives, support services and child care in order to improve and strengthen the economic and social development within the communities.

Chairman Frazier presented members of Congress, DOL, BIA, and DHHS with the proposed 477 Plan and is awaiting approval from federal agencies.

Resolving Tribal Health Care Issues One by One

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

8/24/04

Chairman Frazier along with local department head representatives from Tribal Health, Indian Health Services (IHS), Youth Diabetes, and CHR Program’s came together on Tuesday, August 24, 2004 to address the many issues that affect the funding and progression of those programs. “Let’s stop fighting each other and fight together,” stated Frazier. The group identified barriers and resolved to take appropriate steps to increase productivity so that the people of Cheyenne River may benefit from their services.

The lack of dental services on Cheyenne River is just one of many health care issues that the Chairman has been addressing for quite some time. Tribal Health has been working with IHS to staff quality dentists to serve the communities on the reservation. Currently, one dentist is on contract but mostly attends to emergency dental care in Eagle Butte. However, more dentists will be arriving in the near future with the first full time dentist expected by the end of September and another in November. Plans to hire an additional contract dentist brings hope to reopen a dental office in Cherry Creek. Vern Donnell, CEO of IHS in Eagle Butte recently visited the old dental facility to assess damages to the building. With a few repairs and general maintenance the building will be capable of housing a dental clinic.

As a result of the recent hiring’s, tribal members will not only benefit from the availability of quality dental care but more jobs will be created as well. In order to accommodate the increase in dentists the dental office will soon be announcing the need for more dental assistants. To keep the people of Cheyenne River updated of changes in services, schedules will be posted throughout businesses in Eagle Butte and on the local cable channel 22.

To ensure a lasting commitment, IHS and Tribal Health provide housing for the dentists. The Tribe recently purchased a large mobile home unit next to the Mni Mart in order to provide adequate accommodations. Chairman Frazier is satisfied with the increase in dental care and can now focus on other areas of distress.

Third party billing is also of great concern to the Chairman. Currently Indian Health Services in Aberdeen does the billing for Tribal Health and in doing so the Tribe loses money. Tribal Health is awaiting their own primary care provider number which will allow their billing personnel to directly bill Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance companies. This will allow the money from services billed to flow back into the Tribe. All programs that operate under Tribal Health will be affected by this change. Jayme Longbrake, Health Systems Coordinator for CRST announced, “Cheyenne River will be the first Tribe in the area to take on this task.”

Patients can also play a part in increasing profits by simply signing a release of information form. There are currently 229 patients that have not signed this form. By not signing this form prevents the billing of services which results in loss of revenue. In no way does this violate the patient’s right to privacy and quality health care. It is very crucial that patients are fully aware of the importance of this form upon initial registration.

Chairman Frazier stated that he will continue to tackle the many grievances concerning health issues and will strive towards quality care for the people of Cheyenne River.

Creating and Celebrating Native American History in DC

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

9/17/04

CRST Tribal delegates along with Chairman Harold Frazier will be in Washington, DC the week of 19 September 2004 to meet with Department Head Officials from the Department of Labor, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Indian Health Services in regards to the many projects that the Tribe is pursuing.

One of many issues Chairman Frazier is working on is the implementation of the 477 Plan, which would integrate employment and training programs and enable the Tribe to operate all of its services under one plan and one budget. 477 would allow the Tribe to establish field offices with staff in outlying communities on the reservation. There would also be an increase in funding for the following programs; the Tribal Work Experience Program (TWEP), General Assistance (GA), GA Incentives, Native Employment Works (NEW), Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), Supplemental Youth Services (SYS), and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title IV-A. “Getting this 477 Plan approved along with field offices we can then start decentralizing employment services into the communities,” stated Frazier.

Frazier along with representatives from various Great Plain’s Tribes formed a task force, who are working to obtain the refunding of programs that were originally included in the Indian Finance Act of 1974. Over the years the Interest Subsidy/Direct Loan Program, Indian Business Development Grant and technical assistance have lost funding. “By getting these programs refinanced our Tribal members will be able to obtain financing to start a meaningful business that would not only help our community but provide a decent living for their families.

Chairman Frazier has been vigilante in pursuing prospects that would benefit CRST members and hopes that the meetings in DC will be productive so that the Tribe can move forward in their proceedings to employ programs that would create better opportunities for the people of Cheyenne River. The Chairman has received tremendous support from Senator Tom Daschle D (SD), Senator Tim Johnson D (SD), and Representative Herseth D (SD) and their staff in obtaining results on issues regarding Indian County. Tribal lawyers of Hobbs, Strauss, Dean, & Walker, LLP are also working diligently with the Tribe and their quest for sovereignty and self-determination.

While in DC, Chairman Frazier and CRST representatives will be in attendance to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian on Tuesday, September 21st. “This is a significant event in Native American History as it pays tribute to all Tribes throughout the country, in an honorable way,” commented Frazier.

Daschle, Johnson Announce $271,512 Grant to Build Cheyenne River Nursing Home

NEWS FROM SENATOR TOM DASCHLE and SENATOR TIM JOHNSON

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Ted Miller, 202-224-0224

Tuesday, August 17, 2004 Julianne Fisher, 202-224-1638

WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Tom Daschle and Senator Tim Johnson announced today that the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe will receive a grant of $271,512 to begin development of a nursing home for tribal elders. Daschle and Johnson secured the funding in the fiscal year 2004 appropriations bill for the Department of Health and Human Services.

The nearest nursing home facility to the Cheyenne River reservation is 60 miles away a distance that makes travel inconvenient and forces seniors in need of nursing home care to leave the reservation and the comfort of nearby family and friends.

“A new nursing home on Cheyenne River will allow community members to take special care of their own elders,” Senator Daschle said. “Seniors will receive the skilled care they need without having to leave the community. The facility will improve health care services for Cheyenne River families, giving them the peace of mind that they won’t need to travel long distances to visit their elders. This funding will get the engine going for construction and administration of the new nursing home.”

“People on Cheyenne River should be able to receive care near their homes as they reach their golden years. This facility will keep seniors closer to their families, and provide the necessary health care to this aging population. Senator Daschle and I made this important project a priority during last year’s funding cycle,” said Johnson, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

In 2003, tribal officials approached the senators and requested their help in securing funds for startup and administrative costs for the nursing home project. Daschle and Johnson worked with their Senate colleagues to provide for these costs as part of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2004.

Native Americans and Economic Development

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau (605)964-8308

8/23/04

Interest in entrepreneurship amongst Native Americans is increasing. However, Tribal members find it difficult to get the financing they need to get their visions up and running. Tribal leaders recognize the need to develop working programs and relationships with financial institutions that benefit the Native entrepreneur.

In order to address the many issues regarding Economic Development, United Sioux Tribes of South Dakota hosted a conference in Aberdeen, SD on the 16th and 17th of August, 2004, bringing together representatives from Tribes in the Great Plains Region along with officials from Indian Affairs, SBA, and FSA. Keith Jewett, with NAPC stated, “We have people here looking for answers within the Bureau of Indian Affairs,” he also commended the Tribal leaders for taking a stand. Senator Tim Johnson of SD fully supports Native American Tribes promoting business developments and instigated four legislative efforts that also may prove helpful. The gathering allowed for discussion on Tribal needs and strategies to develop economic development within their communities.

Ray Brown, with the Office of Economic Development in Washington, D.C., spoke for Dave Anderson, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs. “The absence of Dave Anderson, goes to show the lack of respect he has for our people,” stated Chairman Harold Frazier of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Mr. Brown, at times was at a loss for words as his explanations never quite satisfied many of the concerns voiced by his audience. One question that continuously resounded was, “How does the BIA define Economic Development?” For Tribal leaders there is no question, that the lack of quality roads, buildings, and access to basic needs improving infrastructure within reservation communities is economic development. “It’s all related, one thing affects another,” said President John Steele, of the Oglala Nation. “It means a lot more than creating jobs,” added Manaja Hill, with Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Economic Development Office. Bill Benjamin, BIA Director for the Great Plains Regional Office spoke with more assurance in agreeing that Economic Development is much more than what the BIA has done in the past. “I really believe in self-determination and that the best decisions are made by local people,” said Benjamin.

The Indian Finance Act (IFA) of 1974 policy declared; “to provide capital on a reimbursable basis to help develop and utilize Indian resources; and they will enjoy a standard of living from their own productive efforts comparable to that enjoyed by non-Indians in neighboring communities.” Originally the IFA consisted of five programs. Over the years three of those have been cut from the BIA budget, making it harder for Native entrepreneurs to attain financial support.

Tribal leaders agreed that Tribal members seeking to form small businesses benefited from those programs that were cut and would like to see them reintroduced. As a result, Chairman Frazier was appointed to Chair a task force that would to look into the IFA. The group will work to compile information that would support funding for those programs. Once supporting documents are gathered the task force will then take their findings to respective congressional representatives. Stacey Johnson with the Aberdeen Area Office acknowledged that it’s going to take Tribal leaders to get involved to turn things around.

Robert McLaughlin, a Financial and Economic Consultant researched the success of Tribally-owned, small business ventures that utilized the equity grant program, which is one of the programs that was cut from the IFA. The resulting assessment of the Aberdeen Area Office of Indian Business Development Grant Program (IBDGP) found that the process to attain financing was rigorous but once completed, Native business owners had an astounding 89% success rate. Mr. McLaughlin feels this was the most successful financing program within the BIA. This very powerful documentation will help support the need to reintroduce those programs into the IFA.

Indian Representation at the DNC

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

Martha R. Garreau

8/5/04

The Native Vote has been heard and Native American attendance was at an all time high during the Democratic National Convention (DNC). The Convention was held in Boston, MA the 26th through the 29th of July, 2004 and Chairman Harold Frazier of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe was honored by the Democratic National Committee to serve as Assistant-Sergeant-At-Arms. Although the position was honorary, he received the credentials as an Officer of the Convention which granted him complete access to the convention floor. The Native representation was stronger than ever, having the largest Native American Delegation in the history of political conventions to include 72 Native American Delegates, 20 Alternates, 5 Members of State, 2 Pages, a Native American Sgt.-At-Arms, and 4 Members of the Democratic National Committee. Mr. Frazier was 1 of 7 Native Americans from South Dakota that were in attendance to witness this historic event unfold. “Our strong Native presence at the Convention show’s how powerful our voice can be,” said Frazier.

Besides the Democratic Convention there were many gatherings being held throughout the four day event. One of which was the first ever Native American Caucus where Tribal Leaders from across the Nation came together to voice the needs of their people. The theme of the caucus, Native American - Respected and Strong, reinforced the important role that Native people play in America. Frank Lamere, Winnebago Tribal member and member of the Democratic Executive Committee, declared “We will work for those who have no power and we will work for those that are impoverished.” Not only were Tribal Leaders in attendance but Political Dignitaries as well. Governors to Congressmen all stressed how important the Native Vote is and how we have and will continue to make a difference in the political process. Chairman Frazier had the distinct honor of introducing his good friends Minority Leader, Senator Tom Daschle of SD and Congresswoman Stephanie Herseth of SD. Senator Daschle declared, “The way we get to a stronger America is to respect the treaties of America, that’s where it starts.” Herseth thanked her friends in Indian Country and stated, “My hope is that in my lifetime, South Dakota will elect another woman and she will be Native American.” Governor Janet Napolitano of Arizona confirmed the importance of the Native vote by saying, “Without the Native American vote I would not be standing hear as Governor.”

“A Tribute to the Native American Communities and Their Contributions to our Lives and Cultures” was the theme for a celebration sponsored by Governor Napolitano to honor and thank her friends in Indian Country. To commence the celebration a prayer was offered by Redwing T. Nez of the Navajo Nation. Following prayer, Napolitano was honored with a Lakota honor song, by Steve Emery, Delegate and member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Senator Tim Johnson and his wife Barbara of SD were also in attendance to show their support and thanks to Native Americans as well. Entertainment for the evening was provided by “Big Bad Voodoo Daddy” an up and rising local jazz/swing band. “The whole evening was very inspiring and I was amazed by the amount of people that turned out in support of our Native People,” expressed DeAnna LeBeau, Tribal Planner for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe.

Chairman Frazier was also a guest at The North American Indian Center of Boston which hosted a New England Style Clambake to welcome the many Tribal Delegates and honored guests. The reception was blessed and a local drum group representing various tribes performed songs all in the spirit of native cultures and values. During the reception a young Indian voter by the name of Casey Brown Bear, of the Ho’Chunk Nation, and a student at the University of Wisconsin Madison spoke to the people about getting our Native youth involved in the voting process, “It’s really important to get our kids involved, whether you live in the urban areas or on the reservation,” stressed Brown Bear. A family of dancers also provided entertainment through traditional dances.

Chairman Frazier was interviewed by National Public Radio which broadcast live during the convention, in regard to his position as Sgt.-At-Arms. Also with his position came the honor of attending a daily breakfast with the Senators. However, it wasn’t about the recognition he received as an Officer of the Convention, he took great pride in his position as he had the opportunity to represent all Native Americans. “I am deeply honored to have been appointed to represent Indian Country,” stated Frazier, “and I’m glad that our people are finally getting the support and recognition we respectfully deserve.”

Law Interns Depart

PRESS RELEASE POC: CRST Public Relations

LeAnn High Bear

8/9/2004

Law students from Washington University School of Law have returned to St. Louis, Missouri to begin their second year of Law School after spending their summer interning for the CRST Legal Department. To expand his student’s knowledge on Federal Indian Law, Steve Gunn, former CRST Tribal Attorney, now an Associate Professor at WU School of Law introduces his students to, “American Indian Law and Economic Development Externship,” which prepares them to take on Native American Legal Issues.

Amber Goethel, Cynthia Wolken, Kee Wen Wong, and Beverly Yang helped the legal system immensely as they worked to develop and update the Law and Order Code, and spent roughly 2,000 hours on Tribal Legality alone. CRST’s Legal Department is further advanced than any other tribe in the state of South Dakota and the contributions of the law student’s knowledge play a big part in the department’s success. According to the students they were given the opportunity to learn about issues they would not have been able to learn in a Law Firm. Tom Van Norman, Tribal Attorney emphasized, “The challenge for these students was so great because they were serving a Tribe that has so many needs.”

While in Eagle Butte the students also made an effort to learn about our way of life by attending Pow-wow’s, Sundance’s, Rodeos, and were also able to go horseback riding. Mr. Van Norman accompanied the interns to Bear Lodge, WY where they learned about legal issues concerning the sacred site. Beverly Yang stated, “I think the most lasting impression I’ll have is meeting with the Indian people to listen to their stories and talking to the elders.”

Chairman Frazier along with the legal staff acknowledged the interns dedication and valuable efforts, in the tradition of honoring each with a star quilt and honor song performed by Wakpa Waste (Good River), following the opening prayer by Pastor Daniel LaPlante. The Chairman stated, “On behalf of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, thank you. As you move forward, do not forget the Native American People and our treaties, and always remember to uphold the Constitution of the United States.” Although the interns departed more are expected, as law schools continuously look for job placements for their students. According to Van Norman, “It is great to have outside resources we can consult with.”

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe takes Firm Action to Provide for Health Care of Members

PRESS RELEASE CONTACT: Amber Traversie

CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE 605-964-4155

Enough is enough! The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) took official action on May 14, 2004 and passed Resolution No. 187-04-CR. Stating; “the Tribe and its people are no longer able to tolerate the physical and emotional suffering caused by the policies and practices of the Indian Health Service and its doctors.”

Chairman Frazier, said, “We have tried to work within the system. In 2002, the CRST conducted extensive Hearings on the Health and well being of our People. We took testimonies and used the data to inform the Administration. Dr. Grimm and Senator Johnson came to Eagle Butte and listened to our concerns, in the fall of 2003. The CRST has had numerous meetings with the Indian Health Service Administrators. We have met with Members of Congress; Senator Daschle has tried to increase the funding for Indian Health, I have provided testimony to Congress with sound evidence and statistics of our problems at CRST. It is a sad day when our statistics and evidence falls on deaf ears with the Administration. Especially, since the United States Government has obligated itself to provide health care to the Tribe’s people through its laws and through its Treaties with the Lakota Oyate.”

Chairman Frazier stated, “The CRST is now forced to take extreme measures to provide basic health care for the Tribe’s people.” “The health and well-being of the Tribe’s people is vital both to the Tribe’s future and to the exercise of its Sovereignty” as stated in the Resolution. Resolution No. 187-04-CR reads:

“THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council hereby approves of and supports the following efforts to change the policies and practices of the Indian Health Service Eagle Butte Service Unit:

1) The Tribe will assist tribal members to bring malpractice suits against the Indian Health Service by coordinating with private malpractice attorneys to take such cases On a contingency basis.
2) The Tribe will further investigate the possibility of a class action suit against the Indian Health Service
3) The Tribe will hold hearings and gather testimony from tribal members involving Recent problems with the Indian Health Service. This testimony will be brought To Congress with the intent of requesting hearings on the impact of the Indian Health Service policies and practices on patient care and health outcomes.
4) The Tribe will write a letter for Senator Tom Daschle requesting a General Accounting Office study on the impact of 3rd party billing on Indian Health Service funding.
5) The Tribe will meet with local and area Indian Health Service officials And request a change in the implementation of the Indian Health Service Priority system to reflect a greater emphasis on early detection and Treatment and preventative care. The Tribe will support a demonstration Project which will test the economic and medical effectiveness of such change.”

Resolution No. 187-04-CR was passed unanimously by the CRST during its Special Session held on May 14, 2004.

Chairman Frazier said, “There is currently a crisis in health care for our Tribal members and their families at CRST. Out service unit is only funded to meet barely 46% of the health care needs of our People. There is NO quality care for our members and we are losing people because of it. Enough is enough! We have tried the Administrative route, the Congressional Route, now, we will explore the Legal Route.”

CRST Trips to Washington, D.C. to Address Tribal Priorities

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire - Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
April 19, 2004

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Delegates travel to Washington, DC to address the drastic budget cuts to the Bureau of Indian Affairs as well as to discuss local issues with the new hospital and JTAC funds with Governmental Officials.

Harold Frazier, Chairman for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; (CRST) Benita Clark, Tribal Treasurer; Zach Ducheneaux, Tribal Council Representative; Amber Traversie, Public Relations Assistant; and Jayme Longbrake, Tribal Health Director, traveled to Washington, DC on April 12, 2004. The multi-purpose trip was to meet with Government Officials to address the growing concerns of Tribal health care, construction of the new hospital, JTAC funding, to present the Great Plains Trust Reform Proposal and to oppose the 5% across the board decrease to the Bureau of Indian Affairs budget.

The week began with the delegates attending the National Budget Committee meeting to oppose the budget cuts and to advocate for the CRSTs’ priorities. Nationally, all the Tribes were in agreement that they could not operate on this year’s budget and with the proposed 5% decrease the Tribes will have to cease some services to Tribal Members. “Our Tribe and other Tribes through out the nation have been adjusting to budget cuts in the last several years, but its time the Treaty Tribe’s take a strong stand to oppose the budget cuts. The Federal Government has a Trust Responsibility to provide the Treaty Tribes with education, health, and welfare,” said Harold Frazier, Chairman for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. The Tribes passed a strong Resolution to go directly to Office of Management & Budget (OMB) for consultation on the Interior Budget. OMB oversees all Budgets for the U.S. Government.

While in Washington, the delegates also met with Congressional Members to seek their support in introducing the proposed Great Plains Trust Reform Plan/Legislation which better meets the needs of the Great Plains Tribes. The Plan was adopted by the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association on March 18, 2004. The proposed Plan will bring back services to local agencies using the funding that was supposed be used by Office of Special Trustee (OST) to place Trust Officers on the Indian Reservations. “The Tribes are not asking for new money but to reprogram the money that was budgeted to OST to implement their Plan” said Chairman Harold Frazier. “We need services here at the local level rather than a Trust Officer who will be duplicating the duties of the Superintendent. The Great Plains Tribes took this action because the OST Plan removes Trust services and is directly leading towards termination of Trust Responsibility. The National Congress of American Indians, the Great Plains Tribes and the Rocky Mountain Tribes have called for a halt to the reorganization, now,” said Chairman Harold Frazier.

The Tribal Delegates also met with officials from the Department of Treasury to discuss the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Equitable Compensation Act better known as Joint Tribal Advisory Committee (JTAC) Law. The JTAC Law provides the Tribe with a Trust Fund that will be available eleven years from the date of enactment which will be in the year 2011. The meeting focused on the Tribe’s ability to pledge proceeds from the Fund as collateral for loans, consultation on the Tribe’s plan for spending the Fund proceeds, and the types of securities in which the Fund may be invested before the Fund proceeds become available in 2011. In addition to this meeting, discussions were held with Senator Daschle and Senator Johnson in proposing an amendment to the Tribal Parity Act (S.1530) to include the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe so that the Tribe will be compensated at a level comparable with the Lower Brule and Crow Creek Sioux Tribes. Also, in the amendment would be to include the Landowners who have suffered a great loss as did the Tribe and also to include the Tribe in all other future amendments. On their last day in Washington, DC the delegates met with Dr. Grim, Director Indian Health Services (I.H.S.) and other I.H.S. staff to discuss the new hospital at CRST. “The Tribe is very concerned about the Project Justification Document (PJD) that was done by I.H.S. The I.H.S. Document provides for only a six-bed facility and the CRST requires at least a 22-bed facility to adequately serve our people on the Cheyenne River Reservation,” said Chairman Harold Frazier. The Tribe presented a thorough and accurate, statistical analysis of inpatient and ER services to Dr. Grim to support the additional inpatient beds needed in the new hospital. The analysis was provided by Mercer, a consultant firm contracted by the Tribe and documented the need for a 22-bed hospital. Dr. Grim and the Tribe will have additional meetings until this issue is resolved.

Chairman Harold Frazier and other delegates have made several trips to Washington, DC in the past few months to address these concerns as well as to advocate for more funding for Tribal Priorities. “These trips take us away from our families and the people, but with all the cut-backs to our core programs (Tribal Priorities) and removal of services, I want to be able to assure our Tribal Members that the Tribe is doing all we can to prevent cuts in already limited services. Just as all our Tribal Leaders in the past fought for adherence to our Tribal Rights, the CRST has to make sure all of our Tribal Members will receive better health care services and programs will not be cut. This is our Right as identified by the Treaties.” said Chairman Harold Frazier.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives Input from High School Government Class

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives Input from High School Government Class on Proposed Movie Theater

PRESS RELEASE CONTACT:
CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE Amber Traversie
605-964-4155

On April 20, 2004, the Economic Development committee of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) conducted a special session in the Council Chambers. The students from the Cheyenne Eagle Butte High School Government Class were present to listen and see the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government in action. The students became active participants in the decision making of the tribal government when the agenda turned to the proposed movie theater.

Chairman Frazier told the students the theater has been talked about since 1996 and the Tribe was going to make it a reality. He asked the students to give their opinion on the theater. They were very helpful and all were in favor of the theater. Some of the key suggestions given to the CRST from the H.S. Government Class were the following:

- To provide newly released movies.
- The students wanted jobs and asked if the theater would provide jobs.
- To provide a place to go and something to do in the evenings.
Using information from the students about how often they attend movies, Tribal staff members have been able to put together a realistic, workable plan for starting and operating the theater.

Chairman Frazier said, “The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has made progress in the building of the theater. The location will be across from the Butler Grocery Store. The CRST has purchased the land and hired the architectural firm. The Tribe hopes to have demolition of the existing building complete by July 1, 2004.”

In keeping with the Tribe’s goal of promoting economic development, the Tribe will hire a full time manager with up to 10 part time positions available. Chairman Frazier says that students would be ideal for the part time positions.

The theater will have one screen and be able to seat as many as 150 people. It will be multi-functional, including both a stage at the front of the building as well as a coffee bar/lunch counter in the lobby to be used during the day.

One of the interesting discussions the Tribe had with the Government Class was what to call the Theater? The Tribe is considering holding a naming contest for the theater. So watch for the details as the CRST gets closer to building the theater. Chairman Frazier extends his appreciation for the youth and their input.

The CRST promotes education by implementing a scholarship program

The CRST promotes education by implementing a scholarship program for graduating seniors from BIA/Tribal Schools located on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
April 10, 2004

During the regularly scheduled Tribal Council meeting the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council passed a Motion to accept Chairman Harold Frazier’s proposal to implement a high school scholarship program for graduating seniors. The students eligible for the Chairman’s Scholarship Program must be graduates from the Tiospaye Topa, Takini, and the Cheyenne Eagle Butte Schools.

“One of my goals as the Chairman for the Tribe is to promote education for our youth and by implementing this Scholarship Program we are helping our youth to continue their education and return to the Tribe after receiving their degree to enhance our Tribal Government,” said Chairman Harold Frazier.

The Chairman’s Scholarship Program will be in the amount of $1,000.00 per year that will be disbursed in two $500.00 payments, once at the beginning of the Fall term and the second at the beginning of the Spring term. This year the students selected must be enrolled and accepted into a specific degree program that relates to business or financial services. Each year a different field of study will be selected.

There will be two high school seniors selected from each high school to receive the scholarship. The students are required to complete an application and must be postmarked or submitted to the CRST Education Services Department on or before May 10, 2004. The Scholarship Recipients will be announced during the School’s High School Graduation Ceremony.

The following people were selected to serve on the Scholarship Committee: Ms. Guyla Gunville, CEB School; Ms. Joan Upell, Tiospaye Topa School; Ms. Karen Haines, Takini School; and Dee A. Lawrence, CRST Education Services.

“This scholarship is going to be an on-going program and will be continued yearly until they receive a degree in their selected field as long as they maintain a 2.0 GPA. The scholarship will be in addition to scholarships students apply for from other sources and the CRST considers the Scholarship an investment in the future of our students and the future of our Tribe.” Said Chairman Frazier.

The Dream of a New Hospital is a Reality for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
April 5, 2004

EAGLE BUTTE, SD - The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe moves forward in making the dream of a new hospital facility come true for the members of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation. “Meeting with Indian Health Service staff to discuss the design for the new hospital are the first initial stages in building the facility,” said Chairman Harold Frazier.

Chairman Harold Frazier and Tribal Council Representatives met with Kathy Block, Rich Melton, Kathy Mercure, Vern Donnell and Dr. Two Hawks from the Indian Health Service on March 12, 2004 and again on March 19, 2004 to discuss the design and development of the new hospital facility.

The Indian Health Service (I.H.S.) approved for a six bed facility according to their Project Justification Document (PJD). The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe realizing a greater need for the new hospital hired their own consultants to do a thorough and an accurate analysis of inpatient and ER services. The assessment done by the consultants provides documentation and statistics to support the need for a larger 22-bed hospital. This documented assessment will be provided as an addendum to the PJD to support the addition of inpatient beds beyond the six-bed facility currently approved.

The Tribe and the I.H.S. representatives will continue to work together to provide the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation with a facility that will meet the needs of the people. Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier stated, “In our history of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe the I.H.S. never built us a hospital. The Corp of Engineers built the current inpatient hospital after the agency was moved to Eagle Butte, which we have outgrown years ago and since then it has been a vision shared by many to get a new hospital for our people.”

As the Chairman of the Health Committee in 2002, Tribal Chairman Frazier conducted health hearings in five different communities throughout the reservation. “The people came forward and provided testimony on the health needs of our Reservation. What the People told us was very moving and showed a critical health need. We used this testimony and those moving stories to show Congress that there is a dire need for a new hospital and by working together we have brought positive results,” said Chairman Frazier.

There will be further meetings in this ongoing effort with the Indian Health Service Staff and the Tribe. Many preliminary details and decisions have to be worked out, but, it will result in our dream of a new hospital with construction beginning in the year 2005.

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association Takes Steps to Address the Trust Reorganization

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association Takes Steps to Address the Trust Reorganization that is Moving Forward Without Consultation with Tribes

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
March 31, 2004

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association consists of the eighteen tribes in the Aberdeen Area which includes the states of Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. The officers for the Association are: Harold Frazier, Chairman for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is the Chairman; James C. Crawford, Chairman for the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe is the Vice-chairman; Roger Trudell, Chairman for the Santee Sioux Nation is the Secretary; and John Yellow Bird Steele, President for the Oglala Sioux Tribe is the Treasurer.

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association held its regularly scheduled meeting in Flandreau, South Dakota on March 18, 2004. After much discussion on the Trust Reorganization a Resolution was passed to remove any Trust Officers or Deputy Superintendents off their reservations as according to their respective Exclusion Code pursuant to their Tribal Laws.

The staff from the Office of Special Trustee (OST) has stated that, “the Trust Reorganization has already left the station and that the reorganization is inevitable and the Tribes were consulted”. According to a great number of Tribes across the Nation this is not true and they all share the common statement that they were not consulted.

Chairman Frazier stated that, “the Great Plains Region are major stake holders as they represent 27% of all IIM accounts, 36% of all landownership records and 37% of all land interests handled by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.” The Great Plains Tribe has a unified voice to Congress and the Department of Interior (DOI) that true consultation with the Tribes did not occur”. The Great Plains Tribal Leaders all agree that the OST’s definition of “consultation” is to gather all the Tribes together and inform them about the Trust Reorganization. “True consultation is when the Tribes and the Government sit at the table together and negotiate and come to an agreement and this did not happen”, said Chairman Frazier.

The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen presented an alternative Plan in which a majority of Trust function would remain at the Agency level and to fund more positions at the local level instead of top heavy bureaucracy where reform can be implemented closer to those who are affected by Trust Reform.

The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen went a step further by passing a Resolution with the following positions:

* call on Indian Tribes/Governments throughout the Nation to join them in this effort.

“We took this action because we do not need any Trust Officer or Deputy Superintendent on our reservation to duplicate the duties of the current Superintendent when there is a greater need for services such as Range Technicians, Surveyors, Accountants, Appraisers and other Trust services at the local level” said Chairman Frazier.

The Office of Special Trustee has already placed two Trust Officers in the Oklahoma region and is in the process of advertising for a Trust Officer to be placed at the Pine Ridge Agency in the very near future.

Chairman Harold Frazier stated, “OST is moving forward without consultation and we will reject the implementation of their “Trust Plan”. As sovereign nations we have the right to remove any individual who is a threat to our people and implementation of the “Trust Plan” is the beginning of termination and we will utilize our Tribal Laws to remove these people”.

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association is in agreement with the National Congress of American Indians to HALT the Reorganization.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe receives a Visit from John Thune, Republican Senate Candidate on Thursday

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
Jan. 30, 2004

Harold Frazier, Chairman and Members of the Tribal Council of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe met with John Thune, Candidate for Senate on January 29, 2004. Mr. Thune’s visit was to listen and learn from the Tribal Chairman, the Tribal Council, Education Administrators and the public. Some of the areas discussed were: Health Care, Transportation, Education, TANF, ICWA, Housing Finance, Economic Development, Drought, and the Missouri River issue.

Chairman Harold Frazier stressed the Government’s Treaty obligations of health, education and welfare. Mr. Thune responded that the Treaties are the Government’s responsibility and if elected, he would make funding and Treaty rights a priority.

In response to the Missouri River issue raised by Tribal Councilman, Kevin Keckler, Mr. Thune said, “a consensus based approach is needed to manage this resource by the Tribe, States, and the Corp.” Mr. Thune also stated that water and transportation are critical and necessary components for infrastructure and economic development for the Tribe.

Chairman Harold Frazier stated, “funding formulas for all programs need to be returned to the based on need formula, that way it will benefit the Tribes in South Dakota who all have large land base and a bigger population than other tribes.” Mr. Thune replied that this will take Congressional support and will strongly advocate for funding based on need.

Chairman Harold Frazier stated “the Tribes have a great need for a Tribal Liaison at the Congressional level, one who has lived on a reservation and understands what it is like to live on a Reservation.” Mr. Thune agreed that the Tribes do need an Advocate at the Congressional level and if elected, he would welcome suggestions from the Tribes to fulfill that request.

Mr. Thune expressed his support for the entire Tribal issues and needs presented to him. He said if elected, he would do his best to strongly advocate for more funding to improve the living conditions on the Reservation.

Mr. Thune plans to visit the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation sometime this year during his campaign trail and will take serious note of all that was discussed regarding the tribal issues.

NWAF Selects CRST For Community Ventures Program

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
Jan. 23, 2004

EAGLE BUTTE, SD - Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Harold Frazier announced on Fri., Jan. 9, 2004, that he had been notified by Mr. Ellery July, Director Activities and Learning of the Northwest Area Foundation, St. Paul, Minn. that the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has been selected and identified to partner with the Northwest Area Foundation for the purpose of reducing poverty on the Reservation.

Chairman Frazier stated, “we have worked long and hard at getting this selection by the Northwest Area Foundation to assist the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in poverty reduction.” “The success of this 10 year & $20 Million endeavor will depend upon the Tribe and our Communities because it will be up to us to identify what our needs are and how we want to accomplish our goals.”

The Northwest Area Foundation, (NWAF) an industry-leading influencer in poverty reduction, is committed to reducing poverty in its service area, which includes Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon. The NWAF selects diverse communities and works intensively with them for up to 10 years or longer toward meeting the goal of poverty reduction. Communities are selected based on a combination of need, opportunity, and potential impact. The Foundation prides itself on innovative ends to poverty reduction and works diligently to develop an environment of creativity and respect for differences.

Chairman Frazier initially made the contact with the NWAF during the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Summer Session in June of 2003 and a Memorandum of Agreement was signed between the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and the NWAF for the Foundation to visit the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation to gather information necessary for their decision making process. The Foundation made a site visit on September 24 & 25, 2003 and Chairman Frazier has had ongoing correspondence with the staff of the Foundation in providing additional information.

The Foundation will make a another visit to Chairman Harold Frazier and the Tribal Council sometime in February, 2004 and a Memorandum of Agreement will be established an outline of how the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and the Foundation will work together on a poverty reduction plan.

Omnibus Appropriations Bill Passed By Congress - Benefits Cheyenne River

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
Jan. 23, 2004

The passing of the Omnibus Appropriations Bill by the United States Congress brings good news to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of Eagle Butte, South Dakota. The Cheyenne River Indian Reservation encompasses two of the poorest counties in the nation and Chairman Harold Frazier has made it his goal to bring more funding to the reservation to help the people.

The United States Congress passed the Omnibus Appropriations Bill on January 22, 2004 during their 107th Session of Congress. The Omnibus Appropriations Bill included $275,000 for the administration of the new Nursing Home and $225,000 for the Tribal Mental Health Program and the Transportation Bill that included $2.5 million for a Transit System for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. The total amount the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe will receive from the passage of the Omnibus Appropriations Bill is $3 million dollars.

During Chairman Harold Frazier’s short time in office since December of 2002 has made it his priority to advocate for more funding for the Tribe and as a result the Tribe received a total of $6.078 million dollars from the Federal Government. Prior to the Omnibus Appropriations Bill the Tribe received $128,000 for Suicide Prevention from the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs granted $150,000 for Drought Relief that was used as cost-share with the Prairie Management Program to purchase a well drilling rig, $2.8 million dollars for the design of the new Indian Health Service hospital for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe from Congressional Appropriations.

Chairman Frazier stated, “the Tribe depends on the Tribal employees for their input and knowledge of their program needs in order for us to advocate for more funding and it shows that our tribal employees are very much dedicated in providing adequate services to our people as they provided us information that showed the lack of funding to address the needs of our people.” Chairman Frazier continued by stating, “this is only the beginning we hope to bring more funding and jobs to boost the Tribe’s economy in the next three years of my administration as Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe.”

With a Transit System the people of Cheyenne River Indian Reservation will be able to travel from their communities to the nearest town to do their shopping or to travel to Eagle Butte for medical care, shopping, and to do their personal business. Chairman Frazier stated, “I will work towards ensuring that there will be recurring funding for the operations of the transit system so that our people will no longer have to worry about finding a ride to town.”

Veteran’s Hearing in Eagle Butte

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
12-10-03

In light of The Veteran’s Affairs and Housing and Urban Development (VA-HUD) Appropriations Bill and the Capital Asset Realignment for Enhanced Services (CARES) that are detrimental to all the veterans nationwide especially to those in the rural areas, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is hosting a Veterans Hearing in Eagle Butte, South Dakota to provide the Veterans in the region an opportunity to be heard.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is inviting all Veterans, Tribal Leaders and interested parties to provide testimony in the upcoming Veterans Hearing on December 16, 2003 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Cultural Center in Eagle Butte, South Dakota.

The Cultural Center is located at the east end of town next to the Super 8 on Highway 212. Anyone needing a ride to the Cultural Center may contact the Tribal Chairman’s Office at 964-4155 and lunch will also be provided. Harold Frazier, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe stated that, “It is imperative for all Veterans to voice their concerns and needs as this Bill will have a negative impact on all veterans.” The Tribe has also invited Danna Jackson, Legislative Aide from Senator Tim Johnson’s Office to be in attendance to listen to the concerns on Veterans issues.

A Birthing Unit Will become a Reality for the New Hospital Planned on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reser

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155

Dr. Grim, Director for Indian Health Service announced today, that a Birthing Unit would be built as part of the staffing for the new hospital planned for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Dr. Grim stated, “There will be births with or without a Birthing Unit and adequate facilities and staff must be provided, and this may be Cheyenne Rivers’ only shot in the next 30 years.” Harold Frazier, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is elated with the news. Dr. Grim called Chairman Frazier on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 to give him the good news.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has been persistent in advocating for improving the Health care delivery on the Reservation. Chairman Frazier has provided testimony and statistics regarding the inadequate health care and need for a Birthing Unit. In his Testimony before Senator Johnson, Senator Daschle and Dr. Grim, Chairman Frazier called the Health Care on Cheyenne River “a Crisis Situation: he reported; in 2001, there were 210 Births in our service area. With no Birthing Facilities on Cheyenne River the Mothers are transported to St. Mary’s in Pierre. St. Mary’s delivered 145 Babies, 6 Babies were born in the Eagle Butte Service Unit with no OB services and 5 babies were born in Ambulances with no Doctor present, and there have been some infant death.” These are alarming statistics! Chairman Frazier further testified that “prenatal classes and efforts to reduce teen pregnancy are greatly needed.” He said, “Lakota women have the highest rates of some form of cancer in the nation. These are our Unci’s, our Mothers, Sisters and Children we are talking about! We absolutely must improve Health services and obtain an OB/GYN Doctor.”

Senator Johnson and Dr. Grim also visited the Cherry Creek Community and were able to see for themselves the isolation, poor roads and high risk factor facing our Tribal Members. Chairman Frazier thanked the Tribal Council and Staff for all pulling together to provide information and a united effort to demonstrate the Health needs of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. He said, “ it proves that a united effort can result in positive improvements for our People. This Birthing Unit will help, but, we must continue this effort. ”

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is located in Northwest Central South Dakota, and is home to four Bands of the Lakota Teton Sioux: the Minnecoujou, the Itazipco, the Oohenumpa, and the Siha Sapa. The reservation includes all of Dewey and Ziebach counties (among the poorest in the Nation), and encompasses over 2.8 million acres of land. The Tribal enrollment is 14,199, with the unemployment rate at approximately 78%.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe to have new Department - Wisdom Keepers

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
11-03-03

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe during their regularly scheduled Council Meeting passed a Resolution creating the Wisdom Keepers Department. Chairman Frazier stated that the goal of the Elderly Protection Team and the Tribe is to respect and protect our elderly members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe.

The Wisdom Keepers Department was created to honor and respect our elderly members of our Tribe and rather than referring to them as elderly, they will be recognized as “Wisdom Keepers”. The Wisdom Keepers Department will be over seen by the Wisdom Keepers Board who will be appointed by the Tribal Chairman from the Tribal membership of each district in addition to the six appointed members currently serving on the Board. These Board members will serve in the capacity for a period of two years.

In conjunction with the creation of the Wisdom Keepers Department, the Tribal Council allocated funding to hire an Executive Director for the Wisdom Keepers Department. The Bureau of Indian Affairs contributed start up costs for the Wisdom Keepers Department and the Tribe is currently seeking funding from other sources as well. Part of the funding that is sought by the Tribe is for an office building that would centralize all offices and programs that provide services to the elderly. This would allow the Elderly to be able to take care of all their business in one place.

Chairman Frazier stated that “getting the Nursing Home was the beginning and now this is the Tribe’s continued commitment of taking care of our Elderly.” The CRST received approval on the nursing Home after extensive advocacy efforts. A Team of dedicated members continue to oversee the progress of the Nursing Home. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has now selected a company to design the Elderly Village/Nursing Home and the completion date is tentatively set for the Summer of 2005. “We will be able to bring our Elderly home to be near Relatives and take care of them,” said, Chairman Frazier.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is located in Northwest Central South Dakota, and is the home to four Bands of the Lakota Teton Sioux: the Minnecoujou, the Itazipco, the Oohenumpa, and the Siha Sapa. The reservation includes all of Dewey and Ziebach counties (among the poorest in the Nation) and encompasses over 2.8 million acres of land. The Tribal enrollment is 13,270, with the unemployment rate at approximately 78%.

Senator Johnson and Dr. Grimm Visit

CRST, Chairman Harold Frazier to host visit from Senator Tim Johnson and Dr. Grimm of Indian Health Services to bring awareness to the crisis in health care on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation

PRESS RELEASE:
D. Alice LaClaire
Public Relations Coordinator
Phone: 605-964-4155
August 4, 2003

On behalf of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Chairman Harold Frazier will host a visit on August 22, 2003 from Senator Johnson and Dr. Grim of Indian Health Service to address the current health care on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. Senator Johnson, his staff, and Dr. Grimm will visit the hospital and the Cherry Creek Clinic during their visit to the reservation.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is extending their invitation to all the other Tribal Chairmen in the Great Plains Region to provide Senator Johnson and Dr. Grimm with testimony on behalf of their Tribes.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe began a series of Tribal Health Hearings in March and April 2002 in the communities of Eagle Butte, Dupree, Cherry Creek, La Plant and Bridger. The Health Hearings were a very important part of the initial efforts to bring awareness to the lack of adequate health care on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has continually made efforts to provide better health care for its tribal members. The Tribe is experiencing a crisis in health care that is not currently being addressed by the Federal Government. There are only three doctors to serve 7,000 tribal members, only two hospital beds open due to the lack of staff, and the birthing unit was cut from the service unit although there are over 200 hundred births every year.

A new health care facility has been approved for the Eagle Butte Service Unit and plans are underway to plan for and design the facility. The timing of the completion of the new facility depends on when Congress approves funding for this service unit in the Department of Interior budget. The Tribal Health Committee and Tribal Health Department are working closely with the Service Unit Director, Don Lee, and the Clinical Director, Dr. Sophie Two Hawk to improve services in the current facility and to plan for a new facility with additional staff.

It is the Tribe’s goal to improve and provide adequate health care for all the tribal members on the reservation. This visit from Senator Johnson and Dr. Grimm is one of the steps taken by the Tribe to bring awareness to the United States Congress and Department of Indian Health Services about the current health care problems faced by residents in this area.

Tribal leaders who need assistance or information on making reservations and travel plans may contact Alice LaClaire, Administrative Assistant/Public Relations Coordinator at (605) 964 - 4155 or (605)365-7106.

U.S. to Back Native Rights Declaration

Washington
U.S. to back Native Rights Declaration
President Obama said Thursday that the United States will reverse course and support a United Nations declaration defending the rights of indigenous peoples.
Obama told American Indian leaders that the declaration affirms the importance and rich cultures of Native peoples throughout the world. The United States voted against the declaration when the General Assembly adopted it in 2007, arguing it was incompatible with existing laws.
The declaration is intended to protect the rights of more than 370 million native peoples worldwide, affirming their equality and ability to maintain their own institutions, cultures and spiritual traditions. It sets standards to fight discrimination and marginalization and eliminate human rights violations.
Obama administration officials said last April that they were reviewing the U.S. position on the declaration.  The State Department called the decision to support the declaration a “meaningful change in the U.S. position” that resulted from a comprehensive review that included consultation with tribes.
By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
http://www.kansascity.com/2010/12/16/2523993/obama-details-help-for-american.html

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program

Phone: (605) 964-8384

Department:  General Administration

Number of employees:  1

These funds available under this title shall be used to provide assistance to low income households in meeting their home energy costs, particularly those with the lowest income that pay a high proportion of household income for home energy and taken into account family size with high energy burden.

Elderly; Handicapped / Disabled, Children 6 years and under, and Able Bodied head of households.  Meet the 150 % poverty guideline set by Health and Human Services Washington DC

Service Population:  Dewey and Ziebach Counties
Serving 19 Outlying Communities within 6 Districts.
District # 1 – Dupree, Bear Creek, Thunder Butte, Isabel, Iron Lightning
District # 2 – Red Scaffold
District # 3– Cherry Creek, Bridger, and Takini
District # 4 – West Eagle Butte, Green Grass, Timber Lake and White Horse
District # 5 – East Eagle Butte
District # 6 – Swiftbird, Blackfoot, LaPlant, Promise, Ridgeview

Services Offered:
The LIHEAP Program assists the eligible clients in help paying for their energy costs such as propane, electricity, fuel oil and wood.  Purchase or replace furnaces and tanks settings.  When funds become available the CRST-LIHEAP does summer cooling and pay for electricity bills.  Budget counseling is available.

Accomplishments:  During fiscal Year 2005 LIHEAP Program assisted 1,756 approved clients.  FY 2006 assisted 1,013 clients approved.  FY 2005 funding $550,220.34, FY 2006 $374,802.00 difference $193,160.34.  More funds available last year and was able to serve more clients.  This year the Income Poverty Guidelines decreased at eh Federal Level and for this reasons I was not able to serve as many clients as last year, they were not eligible went from 200% to 150% less funds available for assistance.

Locked into CRST LP Gas Co. Propane price at $1.31 per gallon.  Current price is $1.42 and at the beginning of the fiscal year October 1, 2005 it was at $1.60 per gallon.  A saving for the CRST, LP Gas Co. Clients.

Challenges:


Message:
Economics – to use your home heating without wasting.
Readiness – for another high price of heating next fall.
Budget – make a monthly budget and set priority.

Loan Office

Phone: (605) 964-7905

Department:  Financial Services – Treasurer’s Office

Number of employees:  3

Mission:  To provide centralized financial services to the members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Administration and Tribal programs and to build and maintain open communications between Federal agencies and the Tribe.

Service Population:  Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

Services Offered:  Financial Assistance to members of the Tribe through our Support Services Office and Loan Office

Law Enforcement Services

Phone: (605) 964-4567/4571

Adult Detention                       964-2157

Detective Division                   964-4700/4574

Juvenile Detention Division   964-4577

Social Detox Division             964-2150

Number of employees:  80+

Mission / Service:To protect and serve the people of the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation through effective law enforcement services.

Service population:  The entire reservation residents and visitor population.

Services offered:
All Law Enforcement Services:
Police
Dispatch
Adult and Juvenile Detention
Criminal Investigations
Social Detoxification
Court Services and Security Services

Accomplishments

Challenges

Message:  We’ll continue to try to do our best with limited resource and concentration on Community Policing efforts for crime prevention and intervention.  Plans are still in place for District Officers.

Indian Child Welfare Program

Phone: (605) 964-6450

Department:  Indian Child Welfare – Human Services Department

Number of employees:  7

Mission:  To provide shelter for children who have been removed from their homes or parents due to neglect or abuse

Annual Funding Amount:

Service Population:  We can care for 7 children ages infant to 13 years of age.

Services Offered:  We have a daily schedule we go by when a child is brought in by State, BIA or ICWA.  The child is give an admit bath, head check & change of clothes or pj’s depending on what time of day or night the child is brought in.  The children get 3 meals & 3 snacks daily.  They take noon naps, nightly baths.  Transportation to & from school.  The children are checked for bruises, bumps, cuts, scratches if anything is found & looks serious it is reported to the placing agency.

Accomplishments:  From January 2005 to February 2006 we’ve provided shelter for 186 children the main placing agency was state & a few ICWA clients our staff or 7 women are CPR & First Aid certified, have food handlers certificate, are presently taking CDA trainings though the Presentation College, we had the same 7 women working here at the shelter for the past year, we have 4 shifts and every one helps each other out when taking leave, another worker is willing to cover.

Challenges:  Working here at the shelter is a very stressful job but if you love children & love working with children you’ll be able to handle the job, this past year & previous years it’s mainly providing comfort for lonesome children and taking care of sick children.

Message: Please let’s take better care of our children – we here at the shelter love children & taking care of them but these children would rather be in their own home’s with their parents & family than being here at the shelter.

Contracting Office

Phone: (605) 964-8344/8345

Department:  Financial Services – Tribal Treasurer

Number of employees:  5

Mission:  To ensure contract compliance through monitoring of all Tribal grants and contracts.

Services, Disbursing Office)

Service Population:  Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

Services Offered:  Centralized accounting in the areas of receipts and accounts and inform the Executives and Tribal Council of concern within the Financial Department

Accomplishments:  The biggest accomplishment is the employees in our department becoming more proficient with the Tribe’s financial software.

Challenges:  The needs of the people are growing but the Federal dollars continue to shrink.  More Federal programs are requesting the assistance of the General Fund.  The Tribe has gained additional funds through the Congressional appropriations process for special projects but has gained little for the recurring programs such as Law Enforcement, Tribal Courts, and Education Services.  There is a need within the Financial Department for additional staff but there is little office space available for the necessary expansion.

Message:  Our collective challenge is how to make limited financial resources stretch; from individual needs to program needs.

Community Health Representative Program

Phone: (605) 964-8845/8846

Department:  Health Department      

Number of employees:  23

Mission:  “To help people to help themselves” through health education in health prevention disease prevention and intervention.

Service Population:

Services Offered:

  1. Mainly transportation and delivering medication
  2. Home visits to provide intervention care with elderly, chronically ill, prenatal and provide emergency care.
  3. Perform small amount of health education in health promotion/disease prevention to the public.

Accomplishments:  17 CHR’s including staff received Basic CHR Training, four CHR’s without CHR Basic Training and tow (2) positions vacant.  Eight CHR’s have First Responder Training

Challenges:  No funding increase deny delivery of medication and transportation request to the People who have vehicles, it’s like a uphill battle the program still doing less home visits.

Message:  In order to keep the Community Health Representative Program, transporting and deliver of medication must be limited to elderly, handicapped, and prenatal without transportation.  However once this transit system is in operation then the CHR Program should not transport unless if it is an emergency.  The main reason, data collection is very important in disease prevention of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, obesity, and nutrition Government performance results act in statistics will be used to deliver the refund ability of the CHR Program in FY-200

Cancer Early Detection Program - Breast & Cervical Cancer Early Detection Winyan Wicozani

Phone: (605) 964-3010

Department:  Health Department

Number of employees:  3

Mission:  To screen for breast & cervical cancer, early detection will decrease mortality rates.

Service Population:  2,261 women 21 and older (according to the US Census 2000)

Services Offered:

Accomplishments:  Screening women for breast cancer and cervical cancer, having women know about the programs and come back every year.

Challenges:  Having to get a screening mammogram with here every 2 weeks from Rapid City.

Message:  Early Detection saves lives

Brownsfield Program

Phone: (605) 964-6559

Department:  Department of Environmental and Natural Resources

Number of employees:  2

Mission:  EPA Brownfield Program is designed to empower states, tribes and their communities and other stakeholders in economic redevelopment to work together in a timely manner to prevent, assess, safely cleanup and sustainable reuse “Brownfields”

      A Brownfield is a property to be used for expansion redevelopment or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of hazardous substance pollutant or contaminate.  EPA Brownfields Program provides financial and technical assistance for Brownfields activities through an approach based on four main goals.

Service Population:  The Brownfields Program serves all enrolled members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and those within the jurisdiction of the “Tribe”

Services Offered:

Accomplishments:  The Brownfields Program staff has been attending training seminars for environmental response activities from asbestos, Lead, Underground Storage Tanks and HazMat.  The staff is currently federally certified and is capable of handling any hazardous activity.

Challenges:  The Brownfields Program is in the third year of funding and is still trying to develop a Guide for implementing, monitoring and enforcing Institutional controls For the Brownfields Program.

Message:  Get the public more involved in the current environmental issues so as to maintain a clean environment on the Cheyenne River reservation.

Bingo Operations

Phone: (605) 964-8910

Department:  Planning Department – Economic Development

Number of employees:  7

Mission – Services – Accomplishments – Challenges:
The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Bingo operations are regulated by the CRST Gaming Commission.  The Bingo hall employs seven people and offers a variety of entertainment gaming for the reservation and the surrounding areas.  Over the last year the Bingo hall has had good profits, a positive audit and maintained a good relationship with the Gaming Commission.  Challenges in the last year have been in clarifying rules, policies and bylaws of the Bingo operations among the Administration, Council and the Gaming Commission.

Armstrong County Gunner Range Program

Phone: (605)  964-6559

Native American Lands Environmental Mitigation Program

Department: Department of Environmental and Natural Resources

Number of employees: 3

Mission To restore the former Gunnery   Range and it’s original state by such means as tree planting, native grass restoration etc.

Service Population: Armstrong County south east portion of the reservation

Services Offered: We have done a number of assessments on the Gunnery Range,  including wildlife studies, biological studies, soils surveys, and stream classification and erosion control measures.  Tree planting plots have been done and we hope many future ones will be done also

Accomplishments: Some program accomplishments over the last year include completing all the assessments needed for a PL-566 Watershed Grant through NRCS.  We are awaiting approval of this grant and this would greatly increase the amount of work we could do on the former Gunnery   Range.  We have also developed a blueprint for the establishment of the Tribal Nursery.

Challenges: Challenges over the last year include a reduction in funding from the Department of Defense/Corps of Engineers and seeking alternative funding sources.

Message: Preserving our tribe’s natural resources is our goal.

Weather


Education Services Department

If you have any questions regarding any of this information,  please contact the Education Services office .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and we will be happy to assist you.

STAFF:
Dee A. Lawrence / Education Services Specialist
John Ducheneaux / Education Services Assistant

PROGRAMS:
The following Programs are contracted by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe from the Bureau of Indian affairs under a Public Law 93-638 Contract.

HIGHER EDUCATION

ADULT VOCATIONAL TRAINING SERVICES

THE ADULT VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM provides vocational training grants to enrolled Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Members and other eligible Indian Tribal Members who reside on the Cheyenne River Reservation. To be eligible for a scholarship a student must be a high school graduate or have obtained a GED. The applicant must meet all the criteria stated in the Adult Vocational Training Guidelines.

All prospective college students must apply for FAFSA http://www.fafsa.ed.gov

How to Apply

Students applying for AVT are required to submit the following upon applying for assistance:

The AVT program does not have a deadline; however, students are awarded on a first come first serve basis.

THE HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM provides scholarship grants to enrolled Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Members. To be eligible for the scholarship, a student must be a high school graduate or have obtained a GED. The applicant must meet the eligibility criteria stated in the Higher Education guidelines.

How to apply

To receive priority consideration, your application file must be complete by the deadline. The Following documents are required to complete your application file:

THE DEADLINES FOR EACH FUNDING SESSION ARE AS FOLLOWS:
ACADEMIC YEAR…………………………………………………..JUNE 15
SPRING SEMESTER ONLY…………………………………………NOVEMBER 15
SUMMER SESSION…………………………………………………APRIL 15

***IMPORTANT***
Students must submit a new application for each of the terms above. If you are not awarded for the academic year and would like to be considered for the following spring term, please submit another application for the spring term only.

The funding priorities are as follows:

  1. SENIORS
  2. JUNIORS
  3. SOPHOMORES
  4. FRESHMAN

To remain eligible for the Higher Education Scholarship Program, you must maintain a grade point average (GPA) minimum of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale and you must complete the semester earning no less than 12 credit hours. Freshman students may be placed on probation if their term GPA is less than 2.0 but higher than 1.75. Sophomores, juniors and seniors with a GPA of less than 2.0 will be placed on suspension.

PLEASE NOTE: STUDENTS IN DEFAULT ON A STUDENT LOAN ARE INELIGIBLE FOR FUNDING THROUGH THE HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM UNTIL THE STUDENT IS NO LONGER IN DEFAULT STATUS AND IS ELIGIBLE FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID.

THE HIGHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP IS A SUPPLEMENTAL GRANT THEREFORE; ALL STUDENTS MUST APPLY FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA/PELL)

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS


How to Apply

The CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE SCHOLARSHIP is designed to assist those students who would not otherwise receive any financial assistance from the Higher Education Scholarship or Employment Assistance/AVT Grant program. It is considered a “second chance” scholarship and the student must apply for the Higher Education Scholarship prior to applying for the CRST to determine eligibility.

Eligibility

Students are eligible to apply for the CRST Scholarship if they:

 

TERMINATION OF FUNDING

Funding may be terminated if a student:

  1. Fails to meet or maintain the eligibility requirements of the program.
  2. Fails to maintain minimum G.P.A. of (2.00) and a course load (12 credit hours minimum) standards per semester.
  3. Fails to submit an OFFICIAL grade transcript at the end of the term to the CRST Education Services Department for review.  THIS IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.  You must contact the Registrar at your school as there may be a fee you need to pay before it can be sent.
  4. Graduates from school-Scholarships are available for one (1) degree program only whether technical or academic.
  5. Withdraws during a semester or discontinues training without providing written notification to the CRST Education Services office.  Only withdrawals for the following reasons will prevent termination of funding:
    1. Medical-must present medical statement signed by your physician.
    2. Death in family (immediate family members only)

These reasons must be verified in writing and presented to the CRST Education Services office before the end of the semester.

 

REINSTATEMENT PROCESS

Students that fail to meet the minimum academic requirements of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Scholarship shall not be considered for future funding until the student through other funding sources earns a minimum of 12 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA in one term. The student shall submit an official transcript for review at the end of the term to the Education Services Office.  Funding may be reinstated if the student successfully completes one semester earning a 2.0 GPA with no less than 12 credit hours and as long as funds are available.

APPEALS PROCESS

Students must appeal in writing to the CRST Education Services Office within 10 days of receipt of notice of termination of funding.  If the decision is upheld by the Education Director, the student may appeal to the CRST Education Committee within 10 days of receipt of notice from the Education Director’s ruling.  The decision rendered by the CRST Education Committee will be final.

Deadlines:  Academic Year August 1st

Spring Only December 15th
No Summer Funding Available
The CRST Education Hardship Grant

Purpose and Guidelines

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To provide

one-time

financial assistance in the form of a grant to aid college students with expenses relating to:

 

PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO THE FOLLOWING:
  1. Undergraduate level students attending college off-reservation
  2. Moving expenses for students attending college off-reservation
  3. Undergraduate students attending Oglala Lakota College/Presentation College
  4. Graduate students attending college off-reservation (does not include On-Line Distance Learning Programs)
  5. Graduate students enrolled in On-Line Distance Learning Programs.

 

Eligibility Criteria

In order to be given priority consideration, the following documents are required and must be attached prior to submitting your application.  If not, your application will be incomplete and will not be considered for funding.

  1. Students are required to apply for the Higher Education Scholarship prior to applying for the CRST Hardship Grant in order to determine eligibility.
  2. Students must be ineligible for financial assistance through the Education Services office.  This information will be verified by the Education Services Office.
  3. Must be a Member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (provide copy of CDIB)
  4. Must be accepted into a Post Secondary Institution (Provide copy of Letter of Acceptance)
  5. Must provide Landlord statement (Rent applicant’s only) this information will be verified.

If the student is eligible for financial services through the Education Services office and they have not completed an application, they will not be considered eligible to receive the CRST Education Hardship Grant.

 

DEADLINES ARE AS FOLLOWS:

FALL SEMESTER SEPTEMBER 15TH
SPRING SEMESTERFEBRUARY 15TH

ALL INFORMATION WILL BE VERIFIED WITH THE EDUCATION SERVICES OFFICE

These programs are available to all Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Members desiring to pursue an academic college degree. These programs assist students by providing both financial and non-financial assistance. Financial assistance is in the form of a scholarship. These scholarships are intended to alleviate the burden of college expenses; however they do not cover the complete cost of a college education.

This office encourages all prospective college students to aggressively seek alternative financial aid scholarships as well as apply for all available financial aid locally. This is done by consulting with your High School Counselor, www.c-eb.com utilizing the Internet by doing a search for Native American Scholarships, www.collegefund.org downloading the application and following the instructions while paying close attention to the deadlines and by contacting the Education Services office. In addition, we highly encourage parents/students to attend the Financial Aid Information Night and College Goal Sunday which is sponsored by www.sdasfaa.org held each year at your local high school as this is where you receive all the information about college and the applications are available at that time.

Therefore, we encourage the student to apply as early as parents prepare their income taxes which is usually before March 1st of each year.

The deadlines for the Higher Education Scholarship are:

The deadlines for the CRST Scholarship are:

Once the student has completed the application process, award letters or denial letters are mailed to the student. The scholarship checks are mailed directly to the College Financial Aid Office and are applied towards educational costs first which are tuition, books and fees.  Any remaining funds may be refunded to the student to be used for living expenses, however if the educational costs exceed the amount of your scholarship award, the student will not receive a refund and may be required to set up a payment plan to pay the remaining balance owed to the college.

Many post secondary institutions provide free tuition for Native American students. You will be required to submit a copy of your Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood to the school in order to receive the benefit. You can contact this office to find out which colleges offer free tuition. United Tribes Technical College www.uttc.edu is not one of those colleges. You are charged for tuition, books and fees and are required to apply for all available financial aid to help cover the cost of living expenses. We highly encourage UTTC students to plan ahead prior to departure by applying early and asking questions about the cost, room and board and if you have a family, you must apply for housing. UTTC has a waiting list for housing, therefore you must apply early. Lack of housing on the UTTC campus is problematic especially for families. We may have the funding available but often UTTC is full. The only colleges that are basically “free” are Haskell Indian Nations University www.haskell.edu at Lawrence KS and Southwestern Polytechnic Institute www.sipi.bia.edu at Albuquerque NM.

The CRST Education Services staff is available to assist you. If you need college information, we can provide you with toll-free telephone numbers www.sdasfaa.org to contact the college with your requests or we can request the information for you. We can assist you in completing the forms, however, we highly encourage the student to do the best they can as the student must become familiar with the process themselves in order to be successful at college.

Message to parents: Your college student needs your support. www.eac-easci.org
We encourage parents to communicate with their student, help them by encouraging them to stay in school and by providing them with emotional support as well as financial support when needed. This is a very important factor in college success.

If you have any questions regarding any of this information, please contact the Education Services office and we will be happy to assist you. 

Our Giving Hearts

Within our culture we shared everything with everyone. If one discovered an abundance of any thing…meat, berries, furs for pelts etc. that one took great pleasure in sharing it with everyone else. We gave gifts always, not just on special occasions. We gave away the best of what we had to others knowing they would probably give it away to another who needed it more than they did. It was not ours to keep as a possession but was given to us by the Creator to give to another. So contrary is the ‘getting’ of the western world to the ‘giving’ of our world that it cannot be comprehended by those who work to obtain a higher status of having more than their fellow human beings. If we starved, we all starved, if we feasted, we all feasted. We had no social hierarchy of the have’s and the have not’s. Thus, we were happy and we were free.

Our Language

At the center of our culture was our language. The Lakota language has no gender nouns or pronouns because we were “the people” not the men and women, the girls and boys, we lived as one. The language itself is what enabled everyone to think Red Road as well. The English language cannot translate the Lakota language because it lacks the same meaning. To speak Lakota requires one think differently in the understanding of its words and symbols of oneness with all things. Our language was integral to our society’s function and unity. It was our language that imparted the stories of our culture, of our spiritual life, and the walk on the Red Road way of life. Our way of life was not a religion. It was, and should be again, a way of being.

Sacred Ceremonies

Our sacred ceremonies empowered, cleansed, and unified us. Our medicine men healed us with plants from the earth. Our women enabled us to thrive by their nurturing spirits and commitment to the ideal of “what is best for everyone”. They were involved in our decision making and important contributors because they clung to the principles of caring for all. Women were the keepers of the flame of our culture. They were perceived as closer to the Creator because they gave birth, so they were honored as the ones who maintained the extended family.

Our culture included art, song, and dancing to drumbeats that reverberated to the heartbeat of the Earth. We lived as part of the universe and honored the moon, the stars, the sun and sky and every living thing under the sky. We purified ourselves in ceremonial Sweat Lodges to be clean in heart, body and mind so the spirits of our ancestors could come to teach and heal us. We went on Vision Quests into the wilderness alone to seek oneness with the Creator. We prayed and fasted for visions that would help us grow in our knowledge of the path of Red Road we walked to spirituality. This was a road of peace and spiritual depth that focused upon maintaining our cultural ways and sustaining our community. This was a road of self-sacrifice that insured each one knew the greater whole was our security and maintaining that oneness was integral to our society.

Lakota Lifeways

Our way of life is simple. All decisions were based with the best interest of the entire Lakota Nation, and the people had a voice in all decisions. Our leaders were not better than the followers, the leaders understood they did not possess power over the people. It was understood that with the great responsibility to care for the people came many risks and possibility of death. Everyone was equal and none were left hungry, homeless or in need.

Everything that was gathered and stored for survival was shared equally. The leaders did not horde or gather in abundance material things for just a few. Elite society warriors were trained and appointed to maintain order within the camp or during movement of the camp.

For those who did not revered the principles of oneness, equality, and fairness were disciplined verbally, physically or to the extreme of banishment, to even death. This was depending on the severity of the violation or crime. No one person was more important than the people. Survival requires a cooperative effort on the part of each individual. Great value was placed on human life and greater value was placed in the whole nation. We did not support vengeance or retaliation, this was the duties of the Akicita Society, to deal with wrong doers.

We lived in freedom by hunting and gathering from the fruits of Mother Earth. Our time was spent in community, in ceremony, and in sharing our lives with one another, specially with our children. We lived not as a single family but as extended families where in all were our relations. This kept us strong because everyone took care of one another, there were no orphans. the barter system was utilized rather than the monetary system because there was no need to buy what Mother Earth provided for our survival. We stored up provisions for the winter, gathering medicine, berries, fish, and dried buffalo meat, as winters were lone and hard.

Lakota Community

Community is a way of life and it encompasses people from near and far and it also includes those who do not live on our land. We see people, nature, the system of commerce and trade, and even ceremony as our community. We take great care to preserve our way of life which is demonstrated in our communities so whenever we gather for a ceremony, a business meeting, a council meeting or a social event…we are a community. We gather with the purpose of accomplishing our goals of course, but we also remain aware that community is a time of visiting and showing respect to our elders and seeing that they are well. We conduct our community affairs that set an example for any children who may be present.

We behave with respect for all those present and we enjoy ourselves. We socialize, we laugh, we tease one another and we are relaxed in our approach to accomplishing our goals that were set for the occasion. We still get things done, but we have not ignored the community of all gathered there. In our own way, we keep negative aspects such as complaining and gossip out our circles. We present all things in light of possibility and options…versus finger pointing and criticism. Thus we build community and make it stronger…we do not destroy the bonds of our oneness.

We strive to remember that what is business related is community related because business choices affect the community and the community affects business because all are intertwined and intermingled in a common web of togetherness. We plan for today, yet do not neglect to acknowledge tomorrow and see the vision of our children in the future. We make our final decisions accordingly. Traditionally, we would consider those of generations far beyond our children, our children’s children and so forth. We know our future depends on the strength of our community today.

We must live by this Way because the future depends upon our decisions now, the awareness of the people, and the strength of each fiber of the web that is woven. We look to our ancestors for guidance and to those we trust to make every attempt to secure our people’s future. Community is our focus and our way of life. Community is our culture just as it has always been.

We are all one.

Lakota Sioux Creation Myth - Wind Cave Story

“In the beginning, prior to the creation of the Earth, the gods resided in an undifferentiated celestial domain and humans lived in an indescribably subterranean world devoid of culture.
               
Chief among the gods were Takushkanshkan (“something that moves”), the Sun, who is married to the Moon, with whom he has one daughter, Wohpe (“falling star”).

Old Man and Old Woman, whose daughter Ite (“face”) is married to Wind, with whom she has four sons, the Four Winds.

Among numerous other spirits, the most important is Inktomi (“spider”), the devious trickster. Inktomi conspires with Old Man and Old Woman to increase their daughter’s status by arranging an affair between the Sun and Ite.

The discovery of the affair by the Sun’s wife leads to a number of punishments by Takuskanskan, who gives the Moon her own domain, and by separating her from the Sun initiates the creation of time.

Old Man, Old Woman, and Ite are sent to Earth, but Ite is separated from the Wind, her husband, who, along with the Four Winds and a fifth wind presumed to be the child of the adulterous affair, establishes space.

The daughter of the Sun and the Moon, Wohpe, also falls to earth and later resides with the South Wind, the paragon of Lakota maleness, and the two adopt the fifth wind, called Wamniomni (“whirlwind”).

The Emergence
Alone on the newly formed Earth, some of the gods become bored, and Ite prevails upon Inktomi to find her people, the Buffalo Nation. In the form of a wolf, Inktomi travels beneath the earth and discovers a village of humans. Inktomi tells them about the wonders of the Earth and convinces one man, Tokahe (“the first”), to accompany him to the surface.

Tokahe does so and upon reaching the surface through a cave (Wind Cave in the Black Hills), marvels at the green grass and blue sky. Inktomi and Ite introduces Tokahe to buffalo meat and soup and shows him tipis, clothing, and hunting utensils.

Tokahe returns to the subterranean village and appeals to six other men and their families to travel with him to the Earth’s surface.

When they arrive, they discover that Inktomi has deceived them: buffalo are scarce, the weather has turned bad, and they find themselves starving. Unable to return to their home, but armed with a new knowledge about the world, they survive to become the founders of the Seven Fireplaces.”

www.crystalinks.com/sioux.html

The Black Hills (in western South Dakota, USA)
About 20 miles to the west of the Pine Ridge Reservation is the Black Hills (Paha Sapa), a sacred, spiritual and hallowed spot to the Lakota Sioux. After the treaty was signed in 1868, the Sioux were promised the Black Hills forever. But after gold was discovered the promise was broken by the US Government. Now, to many Indians, the Black Hills are tarnished with the heads of five dead presidents and has become a veritable “Coney Island.”

“We Indians saw it as a beautiful place where we can go and pray and to receive something, perhaps, that is better than the gold that is in there. A lot of our creation stories and a lot of our Indian medicine came from the Black Hills.
-Dog Eagle”

Read More About Our History

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Flag

 

Credit: Tribal Flag & logo developed by Sidney Kieth, February 26, 1975

 

Native Arts and Crafts

Native Art.

Tribal Court

Archive Tribal News

U.S. to back Native Rights Declaration

Apology Accepted

Grand Opening of the second Tribal field office on the reservation.

A Duckwall-Alco Store, Inc. in the Future for Cheyenne River

Jaci Etzkorn from Cheyenne River Crowned Miss Indian Rodeo

CRST to Receive $1M for Water Intake

Tribal Council and Chairman Meet with United Tribes Technical College Students

General Grisoli of Army Corp of Engineers Meets with Tribal Council and Vice Chairman on Water Needs for Cheyenne River

Baker Family Fire

GPTCA Selects Local Tribal Leaders To Run For National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Office

Cheyenne River Leader Departs for Iraq

Millions Received for Cheyenne River Roads

Senator Thune Visits IHS Hospital at Cheyenne River

MARINE - Beaumeister Departs for Iraq

CRST Youth Coordinator Brings Soccer to Town

Transportation Department Update: Fox Ridge Road

More Smoke and Mirrors for Indian People

Introducing the Cheyenne River Youth Little League

Cheyenne River Begins Road Construction

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives $1 million Economic Development Grant from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community

American Ba Professional League try-out to be held locally this month

Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Eldery Village

Cheyenne River Member Victorious in Senior Olympics

Long Awaited CRST Elderly Village to Begin Construction

American Basketball Association Professional League try-out to be held locally in July

Chairman Frazier Encourages Students to be Familiar With Tribal Laws and Ordinances

Chairman Visits CEB HS Govt. Class

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal 2006 Legislative Priorities Addressed Before Congress and the Administration

Chairman Frazier’s Successfully Testifies before Congressional Appropriations Sub Committee

Mni Waste on Cheyenne River

Daschle Visits Cheyenne River

The CRST and its Relationship to Si Tanka University

Chairman Frazier Will Testify To the House Committee on Appropriations for the Fiscal Year 2006 Budget

Separation of Si Tanka University from Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Government

Group Calls for Congress to Ensure Water Not Cut Off and Avoid Disaster

AB Resources and Carbon Credits

Upcoming Community Events Planned

Condolences to Red Lake

Tribe Receives $1.5 Million to Pave and Curb China Town Street

False Promises and Reneged Agreements by the BIA Will Force Closure of Si Tanka University

Latest Release on State of the Tribe Address

Historic State of the Tribe Address

November 2004 General Election Results

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Makes Progress on Movie Theater

Decentralizing With a 477 Plan

CRST leading the Initiative on Addressing the Poor Quality of Health Care in Indian Health Services

Creating and Celebrating Native American History in DC

Resolving Tribal Health Care Issues One by One

Native Americans and Economic Development

Daschle, Johnson Announce $271,512 Grant to Build Cheyenne River Nursing Home

Law Interns Depart

Indian Representation at the DNC

Daschle Thanks Chairman Harold Frazier for Service at Democratic National Convention

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe takes Firm Action to Provide for Health Care of Members

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Receives Input from High School Government Class on Proposed Movie Theater

CRST Trips to Washington, D.C. to Address Tribal Priorities

The CRST promotes education by implementing a scholarship program for graduating seniors from BIA/Tribal Schools located on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation

The Dream of a New Hospital is a Reality for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

The Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association Takes Steps to Address the Trust Reorganization that is Moving Forward Without Consultation with Tribes

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe receives a Visit from John Thune, Republican Senate Candidate on Thursday, January 29, 2004 

NWAF Selects CRST For Community Ventures Program

Omnibus Appropriations Bill Passed By Congress - Benefits Cheyenne River

Veteran’s Hearing in Eagle Butte

The CRST is declaring November 25, 2003, as a Day of Mourning for PFC Sheldon Hawk Eagle

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe to have new Department - Wisdom Keepers

A Birthing Unit Will become a Reality for the New Hospital Planned on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation

Senator Johnson and Dr. Grimm Visit


Indian Health Service Clinic, Eagle Butte

Contact: Justin Keckler, acting CEO
Hwy 212 S. of Main St.
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri., 24 hour emergency room services
Phone: 605-964-3007
Business Type: Medical, hospital
Services: Medical services
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International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros (ISPMB)

Contact: Karen A. Sussman
PO Box 55
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-6866
Website:  www.ispmb.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: 501 (c) (3) dedicated to saving America’s wild horses and burros/Bed and Breakfast with Wild Horse Viewing “The Wonder of Wild Horses”
Services: One hour tours-half and full day tours available or overnight which includes three meals, a full day of touring, and overnight accommodations at our ranch. Featured in 2004 National Geographic’s web site as the best expirence for both writer and phtographer in their one-year- travels across the U.S. Details- Imagine a time far removed when eagles soared in teh skies and the wild horses galloped across teh prairies. Thi9s is a unique opportunity to experience this once again seeing a rare herd of wild horses- untouched for nearly 400 years. Arm yourself with a camera and capture on filmstallions protection their harem bands from taunting bachelor bands. See foals frolicking in teh sunshine. Spend an overnight on this wild horse ranch nestled in the heart of the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. Call for Reservations.
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Isabel - Western Dakota Bank

PO Box 76 / 106 Main St. 
Isabel, SD 57633
Hours: 9 am - 3 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 466-2115
Fax: 466-2138
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Isabel Cooperative and Hardware

Contact: Bill Knowlton
PO Box 15 / 224 N. Main St.
Isabel, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Fri., 8 am - noon, Sat
Phone: 605-466-2129
Fax: 605-466-2576
Business Type: hardware/Lumber
Services: hardware, lumber, household items, cat and dog food, vet supplies, farm and ranch products, automotive, lawn and garden, metal work (siding),paint, plumbing and heating
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Isabel Dakotan

Contact: Barbara Begeman
PO Box 207 / 403 Main St. 
Isabel, SD 57633
Phone: (605) 466-2258
Fax: (605) 446-2258 or 466-2124
Website:  http://users.lakotanetwork.com/dakotan/index.html
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
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Isabel Super Valu

Contact: Junella Alley
PO Box 91 / Main St.
Isabel, South Dakota 57633
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Sat.; closed Sun.
Phone: 466-2359
Fax: 466-2359
Business Type: grocery supplier
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J & P Video

Contact: Susie Joaquin or Cindy Petersen
PO Box 57 / Main St. 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 11:30 am - 9:30 pm, Mon. - Fri; 2:00 - 10:00, Sat. and Sun. 
Phone: 605-964-1117
Business Type: video rentals
Services: video rentals and arcade
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J&G Murray Trucking

Contact: Jayme Murray
PO Box 277
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, part time business
Phone: 605-964-8795
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: hauling cattle
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Jackson’s Redi-Mix

Contact: Bob Jackson
HC 83 Box 512
Firesteel, South Dakota 57628
Hours: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
Phone: 605-865-3233
Business Type: Construction, concrete
Services: ready mix concrete, rock, pre-cast
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JNS Concession

Contact: Juan Fernandez
PO Box 733
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Vary
Phone: 605-964-3313
Services: concession stand business
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Joe’s Hardware & Lumber

Contact: Joe Scherer
909 Main St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota
Hours: 7:00 am - 6:00 pm, Mon. - Fri., 7:00 am - 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm, Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3601
Business Type: hardware/Lumber
Services: General Hardware, Lumber, Paint, etc.
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JTR Trips, Eagle Butte

Contact: Jared, Tyson and Rebecca LaPlante
101 S. Main Street
Eagle Butte
Hours: 10 am – 6 pm, Mon. – Sat.; closed Sun
Phone: 605-964-8747
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: department store
Services: embroidery services, jewelry, clothing, caps and shoes
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Kate’s Goodies

Contact: Kathleen Maynard
PO Box 1091, 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 10 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-200-0041
Business Type: custom baked goods
Services: homemade pies, breads, rolls, etc.
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Keller & Wolff Chiropractic Clinic

Contact: Dr. Wolff
1711 W. Hwy 12
Mobridge, South Dakota
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-845-7808 or 800-820-7808
Business Type: medical, chiropractor
Services: chiropractic manipulation
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Korey’s Karing Touch and Tanning

Contact: Korey Fischer
PO Box 1389
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.  Call for appnt. 
Phone: 605-964-1444 or 605-200-1390 (Cell)
Business Type: message therapy
Services: 30, 60-90 minute massages, and stand-up tanning bed
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Kristy’s Kreations

Contact: Kristy Marshall
PO Box 1618
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-2298
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Art, quilting
Services: custom made star quilts
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Lakeside Golf Course

Contact: Justin keckler or clubhouse staff
PO Box 150
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: summer hours 2 pm - 10 pm, Mon. - Sat., closed Sundays
Phone: 605-964-4653
Business Type: nonprofit golf club and association owned by the city of Eagle Butte
Services: 18-hole golf course, driving range, clubhouse, limited golfing merchandise, snack and food sales and bar
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Lakota Technologies, Inc.

Contact: Mark Benoist
PO Box 1761, 102 S. Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm
Phone: 605-964-2500
Fax: 605-964-1300
Website:  www.lakotatechnologies.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: conversion service
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Lakota Thrifty Mart

Contact: Gloria Fire Thunder
PO Box 310 / Main St. and Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 7:30 am - 9 pm M - Sat), 9 am - 6 pm Sun. 
Phone: (605) 964-2945
Fax: (605) 964-2947
Business Type: grocery supplier
Services: full service grocery, food court, bakery, cake decorating, gift shop, western union, pre-paid phone cards, ATM machine, pizza delivery and Color Craft Photos (6 times per year)
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LD Distributing, LLC

Contact: Frank Laurenz
PO Box 359 / N. Hwy 63
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 4 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-3911
Business Type: equipment sales
Services: manufactures and sell post hole diggers, cattle insecticide applicators
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Leader Creek Mercantile

Contact: Cynthia Charger
PO Box 1589
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: call for information or to make arrangements
Phone: 605-964-3438
Business Type: specialty store featuring soaps, beadwork, jams, jellies and hand crafted items
Services: specializes in handmade buffalo tallow soap and all natural products/specialty items from the prairie, produces jellies and jams
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Lenk Restoration

Contact: Quinn Lenk
PO Box 525 100 C St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: Vary, Call for information
Phone: 605-365-5426
Business Type: Restoration
Services: restores tractors and equipment, available for public display purposes
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Lightning Fire Quilts

Contact: Denise Lightning Fire
PO Box 1044
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-6179
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: Custom quilting and design
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Lindskov Automotive and Ford

Contact: Dennis Lindskov
PO Box 890
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - noon, Sat. 
Phone: 605-964-1030 or 466-1210
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: auto repair
Services: oil and lube, tune-ups, exhaust work, brake repair, tire repair and mroe
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Little Moreau Recreation Area ( South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks)

Contact: Dallas Ingels
19150 Summerville Road, Box 63
Shadehill, South Dakota 57653
Hours: State Game, Fish, and Parks Office: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.;Closed on weekends
Phone: 374-5114 or 5535
Fax: 374-9575
Website:  http://www.sdgfp.info/Parks/Regions/OaheSharpe/LittleMoreau.htm
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Little Moreau is a free campground/recreational area provided by the state of South Dakota
Services: Camping, boating, fishing, picnic shelter, swimming, sofball diamond, wildlife viewing including bald and golden eagles
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M & M Auto Repair

Contact: Mike Ducheneaux
PO Box 1092 / W. Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57605
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; by appointment Sat.;closed Sun.
Phone: (605) 365-6292
Business Type: auto repair
Services: oil and lube, tune-ups, exhaust work, brake repair, tire repair and more
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Mandy’s Beauty Boutique

Contact: Mandy Hulm
900 Main St. 
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Tues. - Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3154
Business Type: Beauty Salon / Gifts
Services: haircuts, color, perms, gift items
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Mato Luta Starquilts

Contact: Cheryl Red Bear
PO Box 1156 / 366 China Town
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-3136
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: produces star quilts, wall hangings, shams
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Miller Construcion

Contact: Kenya Lafferty
PO Box 115 / 101 Kansas St.
Isabel, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 466-2196
Fax: 466-2300
Services: dirt work and gravel hauling
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Missouri Breaks Industries Research

Contact: Marcia O’Leary
HCR 64 Box 52
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-3418
Fax: 605-964-3415
Website:  www.mbiri.com
Business Type: non profit/medical
Services: An Indian-owned company located on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. Works to increase medical and technological support services to people of rural Western South Dakota to improve the quality of life. Identifies and develops solutions for reducing chronic disease in our communities. Offers programs highlighting respiratory therapy (focusing on asthma training), nutritional counseling, durable medical equipment, and providing home medical equipment for the recovering or chronically ill patient. Assists with medical research, protocol development, technological support and data analysis for program development.
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Mni Mart Inc.

Contact: Donna Clausen
PO Box 530
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 6 am - 11 pm, Mon. - Thurs., 6 am - Midnight, Fri. - Sat.; 8 am - 11 pm, Sun.
Phone: (605) 964-3333
Business Type: convenience store, laundry mat
Services: fuel, grocery, and laundry mat
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Moreau Grand Electric

Contact: Melissa Maher, General Manager
PO Box 8 / 405 9th St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 7 am - 4 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-865-3512
Fax: 605-865-3340
Email:  mge.coop
Business Type: electric cooperative
Services: electricity and outdoor grills
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Northern Plains Art

Contact: Kenneth West Jr.
PO Box 820, 2 miles E. of Hwy 212, 2 miles N. 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call to make arrangements
Phone: 605-964-4728
Business Type: artist
Services: horse hair braiding, traditional dance sticks, war clubs and spears
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Northern Plains Coop

Contact: Bruce Keegan
PO Box 127
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - noon, Sat. 
Phone: (605) 365-5331
Fax: 605-365-5533
Business Type: agricultural cooperative
Services: auto repair and supplies, towing service and convenience store
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OctaFlex Environment, LLC

Contact: Lester Vig
408 s. Main St., PO Box 404
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Phone: 605-865-3400 or 605-865-3526
Website:  www.octaflex.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Contractor
Services: Construction of environmental containment systems, tire tank covers and tank bottoms
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Oti Kaga, Inc.

Contact: Linda Pesicka
PO Box 751 / 339 E. Prairie Rd. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-964-4663
Fax: 605-964-4664
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: non-profit, housing development and management
Services: manage projects, referrals
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Out Rider Cafe

Contact: Marlene Schaffer
110 Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota
Hours: 6:00 am - 7:00 pm (M-F) 7:00 am - 2 pm (Sat.-Sun.)
Phone: (605) 964-2469
Business Type: Cafe, Catering
Services: Breakfast, Lunch, Supper, Hamburgers, omelets, french fries, steaks, etc. Traditional country-style food.
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Owl Tipi Art

Contact: Harley and Monika Zephier
Thunder Butte Road 9, PO Box 521
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: 8 am - 8 pm, call for inquiries and directions
Phone: 605-365-5706
Website:  www.owltipi.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Artist
Services: various traditional and contemporary Native American art
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Peacock Photos

Contact: Jerry Peaccok
PO Box 1115
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: Vary, call for appointment
Phone: 605-964-8355
Website:  jerrypeacock.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: photography
Services: senior portriats, sports and photos by request
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Prairie View Enterprize

Contact: Donna Rae Petersen
PO Box 292 / No. 4 Church Rd. 
Ridgeview, SD 57652
Hours: contact by phone anytime
Phone: 733-2112
Fax: 733-2113
Business Type: cultural event organizer and native art
Services: conducts special events such as Talking Circles and story telling around a campfire setting, has prints of Native paintings for sale
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Pre-paid legal services, Inc.

Contact: Carol Robinson
PO Box 135
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: call for information
Phone: 605-964-6247
Website:  www.prepaidlegal.com/hub/carolarobinson
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Legal Service
Services: Pre-Paid Legal is a New York Stock Exchange company providing legal services, including family and business legal service plans, identify theft shield, employee benefit plans, insurance and financial professionals and commercial drivers legal plans.
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Presentation College, Lakota Campus

Contact: Kirk Beyer
PO Box 1070
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: (605) 964-4071 or 888-329-5973
Website:  www.presentation.edu/Lakota
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Education
Services: Serving the educational needs of the residence of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and surrounding the communities since 1980. The Lakota Campus is a branch Campus of Presentation College in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Offering Assosiate and Bachelor degree in nursing, social work, business, and early childhood education. Classes are offered face-to-face, online and via video-conferenceing.
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Ranch House Cafe

Contact: Alan Bakeberg - Manager
PO Box 431 / 1215 Main St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 6 am - 2 pm, Sun. and Mon., 6 am - 9 pm, Tues. - Sat.
Phone: (605) 364-5700
Fax: (605) 365-5700
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Restaurant
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Renee’s Shear Designs

Contact: Renee Schearer
709 Main St. 
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Hours: Tues. - Sat.
Phone: 605-865-3682
Business Type: Beauty Salon
Services: hair, skin and nails, tanning salon
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Ridgeveiw Grain Company

Contact: Jim Berndi
PO Box 225
Ridgeveiw, South Dakota 57652
Hours: 7 am - 5 p, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 733-2135
Business Type: agriculture, grain elevator, feed store
Services: livestock feed, grain, dog and cat food
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Rollin’ in the Dough

Contact: Susie Rousseau
PO Box 104
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call for information or to place an order
Phone: 605-964-4141
Business Type: hobby bakery
Services: takes small orders for baked goods
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Rosie’s Closet

Contact: Willetta Dolphus
Po Box 306 / Teton Mall, Main St. 
Eagle Butte, SD
Hours: 10 am - 6 pm, Mon. - Sat.
Phone: 605-964-7673
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Consignment
Services: consigned, recycled and news items including clothing, toys, household items, dvds, jewelry, small furniture, appliances and more. Inventory and prices change daily.
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Sacred Heart Center

Contact: Kim Heath or Frank McDaniel
PO Box 2000 / 121 Landmark Ave., East
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 4 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-6062
Fax: 605-964-6060
Website:  www.shconline.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Non-Profit
Services: Sevig the needs of the people of the Cheyenne River Reservation region by providing domestic abuse shelter for women and their children, child service outreach program and courtordered visitation services
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Scott Fielder Enterprise

Contact: Scott Fielder
PO Box 47
Lantry, SD 57636
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-2191
Business Type: Construction, carpentry
Services: new or remodel work; kitchen, bathroom, tile, etc.
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Si Tanka University Library

Contact: Marsha Fylleo
Eagle Butte
Hours: 8 am - 9 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-8011 ext. 3127
Fax: 605-964-1145
Business Type: Universtiy Library
Services: free access to materials, books, etc., interlibrary loan, computer use, and internet access
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Siesta Motel

Contact: JT Stout
HC 83 Box 100
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: vary, call for reservations
Phone: (605) 365-5217 or (605) 365-5360
Fax: (605) 365-5217
Services: accommodations
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Sioux YMCA

Contact: Claudia Randall
PO Box 218 B St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5232
Fax: 605-365-5230
Website:  http://www.siouxymca.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: non-profit, youth center
Services: offers youth summer and after-school programs, special events
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South Main Laundry

Contact: Richard (Dick) Zacher
PO Box 572 / 101 Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 10 pm, Mon. - Sun. 
Phone: 605-964-4331
Fax: 605-964-4331
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: coin-operated laundry
Services: Machine washing and drying, change machine is available
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Sparky’s Bar and Grill

Contact: Peg Ley or Ryan Maher
117 N. Main St. 
Isabel, South Dakota 57633
Hours: Cafe, 7 am - 8 pm (except first Sunday of the month) Bar. 4 pm - 1 am, Mon. - Fri., 4 pm - 2 am, Sat.
Phone: 466-2131
Business Type: cafe and bar, catering and meeting space
Services: cafe, hamburgers, chicken, fish, steak, catering available, meetings/event space, occasional weekend buffets bar, alcoholic beverages, pool tables, juke box and dances
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Spotlight Video

Contact: Bill Bosley
PO Box 65 / 202 Main St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: vary, 7:30 am 10 pm, daily; open until 2 am once a month
Phone: 605-364-5757
Services: video rentals, convenience store
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State Bank of Eagle Butte

PO Box 10 / Main St. 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 9 am - 3 pm, Mon. - Thurs.; 9 - 5:30, Fri.
Phone: 605-964-3411
Fax: 605-964-1015
Business Type: Banking/Financial
Services: Banking and financial services, ATM
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Sunmasters

Contact: Jason Berndt
1020 E. Sioux Ave. * at carquest/GTC Auto in E.B.
Pierre, South Dakota 57501
Hours: Vary, Thursday in Eagle Butte or will make special arrangements
Phone: (605) 224-6102 / 605-280-6101
Business Type: auto/glass repair
Services: rock chip repair, glass replacement
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T K Styles

Contact: Troy LeBeau
PO Box 280
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: vary, call for information
Phone: 605-964-8294 or 200-1607
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: engraving
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Ted’s Service

Contact: Mike Rosseau
PO Box 277 / Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 6 pm, Mon.- Fri.; 8 am - 2 pm, Sat.;closed Sundays
Phone: 733-2415
Fax: 733-2200
Business Type: auto repair, towing and convenience store
Services: auto reapir and supplies, towing service and convenience store
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The Gift Garden

Contact: Jessica Haskell
PO Box 1582 / 115 S. Main St. 
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 10 am - 3 pm, Sat.; Closed Sun. 
Phone: (605) 964-8513
Business Type: flower and gift shotp
Services: fresh cut and silk flower arrangements, wide variety of gift items, local delivery
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The Graphic Gallery

Contact: Nichole White Eyes
PO Box 31
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: no regular business hours, call for an appointment
Phone: (605) 964-6427 or (605) 365-7021 (cell)
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: graphic design and digital photo processing
Services: specializes in graphic design, digital photo processing, photo enhancing, scanning and restoration, signage, brochures, business cards and more.
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The Limit

Contact: Richard or Marie Gross
709 E St.
Timberlake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 8 am - 4:30 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 865-3256
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: accommodations, hunting lodge
Services: lodging with full functioning kitchen
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The Plains

Contact: Shawn and Sharon Boehrs
PO Box 380/Hwy 212
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Hours: 9 am - 6 pm, Mon - Fri.; 9 am - 5 pm, Sat.; closed Sun.
Phone: 605-964-4610
Fax: 605-964-4610
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: department store
Services: clothing, crafts, personal items, domestics, footwear, work wear, customized t-shirts, jewelry, gifts, souvenirs, cosmetics/perfume, tobacco, limited hardware, and sewing supplies
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Timber Lake and Area Museum

Contact: Kathy Nelson
802 Main St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57626
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm(summer), Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - 5 pm (winter), Mon. - Fri.; Open weekends and evenings by appointment
Phone: 605-865-3553 (summer phone); 605-865-3546(night/we
Fax: 605-865-3787
Website:  www.timberlakehistory.org
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: museum, gift shop, and historical/genealogical research center
Services: sponsors museum exhibits and conducts historical research of area, features permanent exhibits of local history, art and fossils, maintains local history and genealogical archieves, and gift shop
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Timber Lake Service and Tavern

Contact: Faye D. Kraft
PO Box 219 / 824 Main St. 
Timber Lake, South Dakota
Hours: daily, 6 am - 9 pm
Phone: 605-865-3666
Business Type: gas and convenience store
Services: gas and convenience store, bulk fuel and delivered up to 50 miles from Timber Lake.
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Timber Lake Topic

Contact: Jim and Kathy Nelson
PO Box 10 / 806 Main St. 
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Phone: 605-865-3546 or 1-800-664-3546
Website:  www.timberlakesouthdakota.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: A weekly newspaper serving Dewey and Corson counties and the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation since 1910
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Top Gun Contracting, LLC

Contact: Lester Vig
PO Box 495 / S. Main St.
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri. For emergencies, call 605-280-8804
Phone: 605-365-5673 or 280-8804
Fax: 365-5673
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Contractor
Services: general contracting, manufactured houseing, low voltage communications, security and camera systems, fire alarms and internet services and hookup
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Trendy Looks

Contact: Rhea Stevens
HC 83 Box 1
Dupree, SD 57623
Hours: 9 am - Tues. - Fri.
Phone: 605-365-5130
Business Type: Beauty Salon
Services: haircuts, colors, perms, spray tan, waxing
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Tri-County/Mni-Waste’ Water Association

Contact: Leo Fischer
PO Box 490 / 228 E Prairie Rd.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 4:30 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-964-7760
Fax: 605-964-1025
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: utilities/water
Services: providing water to the tri-county area
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V & H Lumber

Contact: John Hight
457 Main St. 
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Hours: winter 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.; 8 am - noon, Sat; Summer- 7 am 6 pm, Mon - Fri., 8 am - noon, Sat.
Phone: Lumberyard 605-365-5491
Fax: 605-365-5692
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: lumberyard
Services: full service lumberyard
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Vilas Health & Variety

Contact: Jim Stephens or Diane Gesinger
PO Box 520 / 123 S. Main
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Phone: 605-964-8955
Fax: 605-964-8956
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Varity Store
Services: variety store including gifts, pharmacy pickup, photo developing, health and beauty items, baby apparel, Black Hills Gold Jewelry, Montana Silver jewelry and gifts, greeting cards, office supplies, house wares, pre-paid gift cards
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Wendy Fischer Designs, LLC

Contact: Wendy Fischer
Hours: Vary, call for information
Phone: (605) 964-4455 or 605-850-8680
Website:  www.wfdesigns.net
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: graphic design
Services: graphic design and web development
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West River Eagle

Contact: Pauline Webb, Managing Editor
208 Main St. 
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Phone: 605-964-2100
Website:  www.westrivereagle.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Newspaper
Services: Serving Dewey and Ziebach counties of the Cheyenne River Reservation. (Formerly Eagle Butte News and West River Progress)
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West Wind Health Care

Contact: Tiffany Larson
HCR 64 Box 53
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-865-3757
Fax: 605-865-3764
Business Type: health care
Services: home health
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Western Dakota Bank - Eagle Butte

Contact: Scott Gray, Branch Manager
6300 Hwy 212 / PO Box 600  
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Phone: 605-964-6300
Fax: 605-964-6301
Website:  www.westerndakotabank.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Bank
Services: Financial Services
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Western Dakota Bank - Timber Lake

Contact: Butch Webb, CEO
PO Box 998 / 803 Main Street
Timber Lake, SD 57656
Hours: 8 am - 3 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: 605-865-3516
Business Type: Bank
Services: Financial Services
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Western Dakota Insurance

Contact: Crystal Lind
PO Box 998 / 908 Main St.
Timberlake, South Dakota 57656
Hours: 9 am - 4 pm, Mon. - Fri. 
Phone: 605-865-3577
Fax: 605-865-3738
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Insurance
Services: Auto, home, farm, crop and life insurance
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Wild West

Contact: Stacy Smith
PO Box 1779
Eagel Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 964-4100
Business Type: flower and gift shotp
Services: flower and gift shop
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Wilder Elk & Buffalo Ranch

Contact: Casey Eisemann
HC 64 Box 10
Timber Lake, South Dakota 57656 Located 5 miles S.
Hours: vary, call for reservations Business Type: accommodations, hunting ranch and lodge
Phone: (605) 865-3433
Fax: (605) 865-3558
Website:  wilderelkranch.com
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Services: elk and buffalo hunts, bed & breakfast
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Will Gray Custom Leather

Contact: Will Gray
PO Box 93 / 100 23rd Ave.
Ridgeview, South Dakota 57652
Hours: Vary, Call for information
Phone: 733-2030
Fax: 733-2030
Services: custom leather work
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Windshield Doctor

Contact: John Kessler
PO Box 1578 / 223 Main St.
Eagle Butte, South Dakota 57625
Hours: 8 am - 5 pm, Mon. - Fri.
Phone: (605) 964-7826
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: auto glass repair
Services: auto glass repair and replacement, oil and lube, tune-ups, brake repair, tire repair and more
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Working Cowboy Saddlery

Contact: Don Howe
PO Box 156
Dupree, South Dakota 57623
Phone: 605-365-5437
Business Type: saddle and horse riding products
Services: custom saddles, horse gear, chaps, chinks, and repair
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Wynema’s Quilts

Contact: Wynema Dupris
PO Box 1593
Eagle Butte, SD 57625
Phone: 605-365-5306
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Art, quilting
Services: hand-crafted, custom made star quilts
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Zintkala Luzahan Productions

Contact: Karen Ducheneaux
HCR 3 Box 121-F
Gettysburg, South Dakota 57442
Phone: (605) 733-2352
Email:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Business Type: Education
Services: Produces educational Lakota language DVD for youth and first-time language learners
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Ordinance 57 - Regulations for Cultural Preservation

Hill landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn More about Our Culture

C.R.S.T. ORDINANCE NO. 66

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